Wilkes University

English

English professor at Wilkes University discusses classwork with students.

Capture a moment, a feeling, your life, in words. Be an English Major at Wilkes.

English majors frequently become certified in Secondary Education; others take positions in journalism, editing and publication, advertising, or corporate work; or go on to graduate school in English or to law school.

As an English major in our program at Wilkes University, you can choose to concentrate in:

As a major, you can also simultaneously complete a minor in Creative Writing or Workplace Writing.

Each major concentration – as well as program minors – emphasizes the close study of texts, including written, visual, digital, and cultural texts.

Inkwell
InkwellOur student-written Inkwell Quarterly gives you the opportunity to publish your writing, grow your editing and layout skills, and collaborate with your peers on a professional publication. Not only does IQ publish informational articles about departmental events, but also allows staff to delve into feature-writing, as you apply the skills and information you learn in your classes to contemporary issues.

The Kirby Canon
The Kirby CanonThe Kirby Canon is a yearly publication that celebrates undergraduate and graduate student writing, research and scholarship. The essays published in each edition were written by students enrolled in courses offered by the English Department, including General Education ENG 101 and ENG 120 courses, and 200 to 400-level courses for English majors, minors, and graduate students. All Kirby Canon submissions are evaluated by a group of faculty and student peer reviewers.

The Manuscript
The ManuscriptIn preparation for a career in editing, publishing, or creative writing, you can submit your creative work to or work on the editorial board of the Manuscript Society. You can critique a variety of creative pieces, including poetry, fiction, non-fiction and visual art, from the Wilkes faculty, staff, students, and alumni. This process includes creative workshopping, copyediting, and layout. Recently, the Society produced a hardback edition of the Fall 2008 issue and a woodblock cover design in Spring 2009.

Writing Center
Writing CenterThe English Program sponsors an Online Writing Center that employs student writing consultants, giving students an excellent background in editing, teaching and mentoring. And with thanks to Dr. J. Michael Lennon, one of Norman Mailer's literary executors, The Norman Mailer Room in the E.S. Farley Library contains an extensive collection of Mailer's works and memorabilia.

Writing Mentors
Writing MentorsOur Writing Mentors program gives you the opportunity to work closely with a Faculty Mentor in the classroom. This co-curricular program provides experience in pedagogy, research, the writing process , and professional mentoring.


Policy Statement for Students Transferring Three Credits of English Composition

Students who transfer three credits in English Composition to Wilkes from another institution for credit toward our four-credit English 101 may choose any one of the following options to either fulfill or achieve a “waiver” of the fourth credit hour in composition:

Option One: Students may fulfill the additional credit hour in composition by completing a second composition course at Wilkes. Eligible courses include English 201, 202, 218, 228, and 308.

Option Two: Students seeking a waiver from the fourth credit hour in English Composition who cannot take an English writing course, may, in consultation with the English department, submit a portfolio of recent academic writing -- some of which has been completed at Wilkes -- that demonstrates the competencies defined in the English department’s standardized portfolio assessment form. Students intending to submit a portfolio must do so in consultation with the chair of the department. The portfolio assessment form is available in the Humanities office, Kirby Hall 201.

Revised January 2010

The English Major at Wilkes – The Writing Concentration

Our “Writing Concentration,” emphasizes the close study of literature, other texts (including visual and digital texts), writing, research, and critical theory. Our program emphasizes the development of skills in core areas of literary and English studies:

  • The development of skills in language, writing, reading and rhetoric
  • The practice of critical and creative thinking and writing
  • The examination of the diversity of human identity and experience.

As a student in our English program, you can expect these experiences:

  • Select courses from a wide range of literary periods and genres
  • Work closely with our faculty in the classroom
  • Close advising and mentoring by your English faculty advisor
  • Small classroom size
  • Classes in historic Kirby Hall where the program is located
  • Workshop with guest writers as part of the program’s “Spring Writers Series”

In addition, you can also simultaneously complete a minor in “Creative Writing” or “Workplace Writing” while completing the major.

Co-Curricular and Internship Opportunities
You can participate in one or more of the many co-curricular opportunities the English program offers, including The Inkwell Quarterly, The Manuscript, and the Writing Mentors program. To learn more, check out the drop down box above.

Many of our majors also complete internships in areas that serve career interests and passions.

Careers and Professions – Our Recent Graduates
The skills, values, and habits of thought acquired through the study of language, theory, and literature prepare you for leadership positions and careers in law, graduate school, communications, journalism, publishing, business, government service, and other professional areas.

Creative Writing minorThe minor in Creative Writing requires fulfillment of General Education Requirements in composition and literature (English 101 and 120), and completion of ENG 203, ENG 303 and nine credit hours among ENG 190 (maximum 3 credits), 200-level literature survey courses (maximum 6 credits from ENG 233, 234, 281, 282), 300-level literature courses (maximum 6 credits), ENG 395/396, ENG 399.

In additional to traditional classroom experiences, the minor emphasize opportunities to work outside the classroom. This work includes creative writing and design opportunities with The Manuscript (ENG 190 A); writing, editing, and layout opportunities with The Inkwell Quarterly (ENG 190 B); writing, editing, and teaching opportunities with the Projects in Writing/Writing Methods (ENG 190 C).

Why should a non-English major minor in Creative Writing?

The minors in Professional Writing and in Creative Writing respectively help prepare students – whether they are majoring in English, Spanish, Criminology, Nursing, Philosophy, Biology, History, or Pharmacy, for success in their careers and in their lives. Want to write a better resume? Learn how to write a proposal? Learn more about grant writing? Learn more about writing persuasively? These are important skills that make a student more attractive to a potential employer.

But that’s not all. These minors serve the development of a well-rounded person interested in living a fulfilled life. A minor in Creative Writing can help students develop their creative imaginations. Moreover, for students majoring in science or engineering, nursing or criminology, a minor in Creative Writing can help them develop their creativity – an important skill for engineers looking to solve the nation’s infrastructure problems, for criminologists working with the FBI to solve crimes, or for a biologist trying to understand why a squirrel carried an acorn to its hideaway.

For English majors, these minors give students the opportunity to develop their creative writing and workplace writing processes and voice which will prepare them for future opportunities in writing, including graduate school, law, and teaching. In addition, completing one (or both) of the minors will allow students to enhance their marketability for potential employers by having the minor documented on a transcript and resume.

Beyond the technical "course objective" outcomes, what can students expect from completing this minor?

Our faculty focused on developing opportunities for students, beyond what is offered in the General Education curriculum, who are interested in writing creatively and technically. We worked to bridge the gap between general education objectives and the needs of our communities, including organizations and industries.

Completing this minor develops leadership skills that can serve students’ futures whether they are leading in organizational space or, as all of must do, leading our own life stories. In essence, in these minors we’re emphasizing character and competence, trust and trustworthiness – some of the core values of the English program.

English - Creative Writing Frequency of Offering
ENG 203 - Introduction to Creative Writing Once a year
ENG 190 A - Projects in Writing / Inkwell Twice a year (Fall and Spring)
ENG 190 B - Projects in Writing / Manuscript Twice a year (Fall and Spring)
ENG 190 C - Projects in Writing / Writing Methods Twice a year (Fall and Spring)
ENG 233 - Survey of English Literature I Once a year (Fall)
ENG 234 - Survey of English Literature II Once a year (Spring)
ENG 281 - Survey of American Literature I Once a year (Spring)
ENG 282 - Survey of American Literature II Once a year (Fall)
ENG 300-level courses Every Semester (multiple offerings)
ENG 303 - Advanced Workshop in Creative Writing Once every two or three semesters
ENG 395 | ENG 396 - Independent Research Every Semester
ENG 399 - Cooperative Education Every Semester

Creative Writing minorThe minor in Workplace Writing requires fulfillment of General Education Requirements in composition and literature (English 101 and 120), and completion of ENG 202 and twelve credit hours among ENG 190 (maximum of 3 credits), ENG 218, ENG 225, ENG 228, ENG 308, ENG 395/396, or ENG 399.

In additional to traditional classroom experiences, the minor emphasize opportunities to work outside the classroom. This work includes creative writing and design opportunities with The Manuscript (ENG 190 A); writing, editing, and layout opportunities with The Inkwell Quarterly (ENG 190 B); writing, editing, and teaching opportunities with the Projects in Writing/Writing Methods (ENG 190 C).

Why should a non-English major minor in Professional Writing? Why should an English major minor in Professional Writing?

The minors in Professional Writing and in Creative Writing respectively help prepare students – whether they are majoring in English, Spanish, Criminology, Nursing, Philosophy, Biology, History, or Pharmacy, for success in their careers and in their lives. Want to write a better resume? Learn how to write a proposal? Learn more about grant writing? Learn more about writing persuasively? These are important skills that make a student more attractive to a potential employer.

For English majors, these minors give students the opportunity to develop their creative writing and workplace writing processes and voice which will prepare them for future opportunities in writing, including graduate school, law, and teaching. In addition, completing one (or both) of the minors will allow students to enhance their marketability for potential employers by having the minor documented on a transcript and resume.

Beyond the technical "course objective" outcomes, what can students expect from completing this minor?

Our faculty focused on developing opportunities for students, beyond what is offered in the General Education curriculum, who are interested in writing creatively and technically. We worked to bridge the gap between general education objectives and the needs of our communities, including organizations and industries.

Completing this minor develops leadership skills that can serve students’ futures whether they are leading in organizational space or, as all of must do, leading our own life stories. In essence, in these minors we’re emphasizing character and competence, trust and trustworthiness – some of the core values of the English program.

English - Workplace Writing Frequency of Offering
ENG 202 - Technical and Professional Writing Twice a year (Fall and Spring)
ENG 190 A - Projects in Writing / Inkwell Twice a year (Fall and Spring)
ENG 190 B - Projects in Writing / Manuscript Twice a year (Fall and Spring)
ENG 190 C - Projects in Writing / Writing Methods Twice a year (Fall and Spring)
ENG 218 - Writing Practicum and Composition Once every three or four semesters
ENG 225 - Comparative Grammar Once a year (Spring)
ENG 228 - Professional and Workplace Writing Once every three or four semesters
ENG 308 - Rhetorical Analysis & NonFic Prose Writing Once every three or four semesters
ENG 395/396 - Independent Research Every Semester
ENG 399 - Cooperative Education Every Semester

 

Emily Rose DeAngelis ’18
Eighth Grade English teacher, Daniel Morgan Middle School, Winchester Public Schools, Winchester, VA

Rebecca Voorhees ’18
Seventh & Eighth Grade English teacher, Minersville Junior-Senior High School, Minersville, PA

Nicole Kutos '17
Marketing Director, KDG (Kyle David Group), Allentown, PA

Publication: “Dress: A Source of ‘Personal Delight’ and a Reflection of Moral Character”
in Proto: An Undergraduate Humanities Journal, Vol. 6, 2017

Jacob Mensinger, ‘17
Full Tuition Scholarship
Widener Law School

Jason Klus, ‘16
Full tuition scholarship & graduate assistantship
Bucknell University

Tara Giarrantano, ‘16
Full Tuition Scholarship & Housing Stipend
funded by Dickinson Law Alumni & Commonwealth Scholars Grant
Penn State Dickinson Law School

Sara Pisak, ‘16
Contributing Editor
Helen Literary Magazine
Merit Scholarship
Vermont College of Fine Arts, MFA program

Miranda Baur ‘14
Managing Editor, Human Kinetics, Urbana, IL

Brittany Grizzanti ‘13
Baltimore Law School

Jonathan Kadjeski, ‘13
MA, Villanova University
Adjunct Instructor, Wilkes University

Melissa Bugdal, ‘10
Assistant Professor of English & Director of the University Writing Center
Salisbury University

Lauren Carey, ‘08
MFA, Wilkes University, ‘11
Instructor, University North Florida Writing Department
Sales Engineer, Web.com, Jacksonville, FL

Nicole (Zimmerman) Lewis, ‘06
Writing Center Manager
Del Tech Stanton Campus

Fall 2018

 

ENG 352: Studies in the American Novel: Writing Resistance (WGS eligible)
Dr. Mischelle Anthony
MW 3-4:15

"Problems of culture and country never go away. We must attend to them now every bit as assidouously as did the first generation of Americans." - Cathy Davidson, Revolution and the Word

How can fiction be an act of resistance? What if the plot and characters are close to historical record? How does woke literary fiction negotiate between the demands of craft and message?

In 1789, the first American novel challenged a court decision against the author’s neighbor, a pregnant woman who subsequently committed suicide. Thus William Hill Brown’s The Power Of Sympathy Americanized a European genre begun with a coterie audience and polite society. Working through several 18th- and 19th-century texts, this course emphasizes the American novel as social protest. This upper-level genre course requires a class presentation that investigates the context in which this prose fiction first appeared. Though we will examine these texts through a variety of critical lenses, reception theory will be our focus. A required presentation will examine original political moments and parallel texts. Weekly informal writings culminate in a 10-12 page research-supported argument essay.

Tentative Reading List

  • The Power of Sympathy, William Hill Brown
  • Wieland, Charles Brockden Brown
  • Lucinda; Or, The Mountain Mourner, P.D. Manvill
  • Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs
  • Invisible Man, Ralph Ellison
  • The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck
  • Maus, Art Spiegelman
  • Round House, Louise Erdrich
  • Fun Home, Alison Bechdel
  • What Is The What, David Eggers
  • Umami, Laia Jufresa

ENG 397: Technologies of the Book (Seminar & DH-Designated)
Dr. Hamill
MWF 2:00-2:50 PM

This course offers an intensive, in-depth study of the history of the book (or material text), from its earliest formation on clay tablets and scrolls, to its binding in the codex, to its the digital manifestation as pixels behind a glass computer (or phone or watch) screen. Grounding our work in bibliographical methods and textual criticism, we will focus extensively on the mechanics and technologies of book production. These foundations will help us to understand not only how books have been made but also how our relationships to books are often mediated by other layers of “making,” such as the work of scholars and editors who negotiate our access to the “original” texts. Our semester’s work will also focus on the fundamental ways in which books themselves have always been (and will continue to be) transformative technological tools. Drawing upon post-structuralist theory and the latest advances in Digital Humanities scholarship, we will consider the implications of books as technologies of language and communication; as systems of (and structures for) expression, reading, and knowing; and as established and evolving technological modes in their own right that are consistently re-oriented by (and that constantly shape and transform) external technological innovations. As our primary literary texts, which will serve as our core examples for analysis and practice, we will focus on landmark works and “books” by Chaucer and Shakespeare, rare materials from the early American archive, and a variety of contemporary digital texts/media.

Students will complete weekly reading responses, an editing project, a short essay (5-7 pages), a research essay (15-20 pages), an annotated bibliography, a midterm and/or final exam, and a digital project (such as a webpage, digital archive, or an active wiki) with a presentation component. Depending on scheduling, the class will visit a regional rare book and manuscript archive (in NYC or Philadelphia), and students will have the chance to participate in the Undergraduate Conference in Medieval and Early Modern Studies at Moravian College (or another undergraduate conference if applicable).

ENG 398: Hawthorne and Melville
Dr. Sean J. Kelly
T,TR 3:00-4:15
Kirby 108

The term “American Renaissance” was coined in 1941 by the great literary critic F.O. Matthiessen to refer to the flowering of American literature and philosophy (transcendentalism) in the three decades preceding the Civil War (approximately 1830-1860). This course will examine the literary works of two influential figures of this movement, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville. Key works will include: The House of the Seven Gables (1851), The Scarlet Letter (1850), Moby Dick (1851), Pierre (1852), The Confidence Man (1857), and many short works. Important themes and topics to be discussed will include:

  • American identity and the absence (or burden) of history;
  • the philosophical problem of self;
  • kenosis
  • the nature of evil and human freedom;
  • gender and sexuality (the politics of gender and the (im)possibility of the sexual relationship);
  • authorship, artistry, and the limits of representation;
  • daguerreotype photography;
  • the aesthetic-politics of Romance: shame, shyness, and the ethics of sympathy;
  • the “Africanist Presence” (Morrison) in American literature

Class assignments will include: regular participation in class discussion, short response papers, a midterm exam, a final exam, and a final paper of approximately 12-15 pages.

 


New Concentration in Digital Humanities

Our new concentration in Digital Humanities allows you to take your love for language and literature into the twenty-first century. By engaging the intersection of technology and language, you will become an “information architect” who studies and analyzes literature,Digital Humanities film, social media, and other digital texts.

As a student in our Digital Humanities area, you will work with emerging technologies to create a range of digital products, including digital archives, digital databases, wikis, digital maps, digital editions of literary texts, and more. You will analyze how digital processes and products impact the study of literature and disciplines across the humanities.

You will also work in our new Digital English Suite, a multi-media lab space designed specifically for our English majors.

To learn more, please contact Dr. Mischelle Anthony, chairperson of the English Department, at (570) 408-4529.


Internships

Our majors complete internships in area and industries that align with their career ambitions, including writing in the workplace, marketing, film making, advertising, and publishing.


Sigma Tau Delta Honor Society

Wilkes University's Chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the International English Honor Society.

Learn More

 

 

 


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