Honors Program Office Staff

Photo courtesy of Sean Schmoyer

The Wilkes University Honors Program cultivates opportunities for self-directed, self-motivated, intellectually curious students to join others with shared interests and aspirations in a collaborative learning community.

Generally, honors course components enable students to pursue breadth, depth, complexity and/or interdisciplinarity within their undergraduate education, helping to cultivate knowledge and skills that advance students’ intellectual, personal and professional development; their contributions to the Wilkes campus community; and their preparation for post-graduate success, whether through employment or continued education.

Honors components should constitute approximately 15-20% of a student’s work in a class. This could be quantified by proportion of final grade and/or by proportion of total assignments.

Options: Potential Modes of Learning

  • independent work, such as a research, case study or creative project within the student’s discipline (in-depth learning)
  • exploration of broad themes and/or enduring questions across disciplines (breadth of learning)
  • experiential learning, such as internships, field work and study abroad
  • service-learning (conscious and purposeful integration of service and learning elements)
  • residential learning community (conscious and purposeful integration of living and learning elements)
  • intercollegiate undergraduate academic competitions, presentations/conferences, and/or publications
  • experimental or innovative pedagogy

Options: Potential Topics

  • trends, issues and/or best practices within the student’s discipline
  • communities, ideas, practices, methodologies and/or values unfamiliar to the student

Options: Potential Skill Outcomes

  • problem solving
  • project management
  • critical reading (ability to evaluate evidence-based arguments and judgments)
  • critical thinking (ability to make evidence-based arguments and judgments)
  • clear and persuasive writing
  • clear and persuasive oral presentation
  • artistic literacy
  • metacognition (analysis of not just what is known, but also of how it comes to be known)
  • comfort with ambiguity, uncertainty and the unfamiliar

The Wilkes University Honors Program endorses the core values of academic rigor (beyond academic expectations of regular section offerings), leadership, integrity (demonstrated learning of ethics and values), self-awareness (emphasis on self-reflection), importance of building community and appreciating diversity. Honors course components should reflect one or more of these core values.

Terminology

&H (“And H”)

An &H section is added to an existing course in which both honors and non-honors students are enrolled to signal that the honors students have the opportunity to earn honors course credit. To earn this credit, honors students must be enrolled specifically in the &H section and they must satisfactorily complete work complementary to the existing syllabus. An honors student is allowed only one grade of 2.5 in an honors course to receive honors credit. All other honors course grades must be a minimum of 3.0.

H (“standalone Honors course”)

An H section signals that all students enrolled in the course complete work that would yield honors credit for that course. Non-honors students could enroll in such a course with instructor permission, but while they would need to complete all of the same work as the honors students, they would receive only non-honors credit. An honors student is allowed only one grade of 2.5 in an honors course to receive honors credit. All other honors course grades must be a minimum of 3.0.

Fall 2021 Honors Courses

Note: For courses that have Honors ("&H") sections, students must register for the &H section to get Honors credit.

ACC 161 &H - Fin Acct & Dec Making - Chisarick C

  • Description coming soon.

ANT 102 &H - Cultural Anthropology/HONORS  - Winkler L

  • This course surveys the methods and topics used in the study, description, and comparison of human cultures. Topics include a look at various aspects of human cultures around the world, intercultural relations, globalization and modern issues, and theories used to explain human culture. Course content is based upon case and cross-cultural studies. Honors students: Students enrolled in the Honor’s designated section of this course are expected to read an assigned ethnography and complete a book review of it. In addition, they are expected to do independent research on the current status of the cultural group featured in the ethnography and do an in-class presentation using power-point on their ethnography and the current status of the group.

ANT 211 &H - Anthro Thru Film/WGS/Honors - Winkler L

  • This course is intended to be a survey of still photography and cinematography in the depiction of cultures across the globe. The overall goal of the course will be to look at how anthropology and world cultures have been depicted through film. This will include a discussion of diversity, gender roles and depictions of gender and social status as displayed in filmmaking by anthropologists. I will be adding a historical framework by looking at early films and their depiction of people and culture. These capture a point in time in anthropology known as the ethnographic present and are part of how we see other cultures as part of global diversity. Honors students: Students in the Honors program who are taking this course as an Honors designated course will be expected to do a documentary film project in addition to the two exams and weekly reflections mentioned above. The film project will involve creating a five minute plus film segment on some aspect of your personal narrative and cultural space. It will require review of anthropological ethics, development of personal release forms, and filming, and editing. Students will also develop a brief written reflection describing the meaning of the documentary and its symbolism in demonstrating aspects of their own cultural narrative.

BIO 105/EGY 105/EES 105 &H - Energy in our World - Klemow K

  • No description provided.

BIO 328 &H - Developmental Biology/HONORS - Kadlec L

  • No description provided.

BIO 330 & H - Intro to Bioformatics Apps - Terzaghi W

  • The course will be evaluated entirely on homework assignments and projects.  There will be 14 homework assignments worth 5 points each, and two projects worth 15 points each. Projects will be similar to the homework assignments, except that you will use the skills that you have learned to solve a problem on your own. All students will perform the same homework assignments, but honors students and MS students will perform more difficult projects which will account for 30% of the grade. 

BIO 398 &H - T: Biomedical Ethics/Premed Sch. - Gutierrez L 

  • This course consists of lectures reviewing the current opinions of the American Medical Association (AMA) regarding critical issues in medicine. Students will be familiar with the nine principles of medical ethics as the fundamentals for the exercise of medicine. All these principles are related and should guide the behavior of the medical students and physicians. This course also offers ethical recommendations for interprofessional relations. Finally Biomedical Ethics explores some ethical considerations for challenging topics in biomedical research and the use of technology. Honors students: Twenty weekly essays.

COM 101 &H - Fund. of Public Speaking - Briceno M

  • The additional Honors requirements for COM 101 relate to all of the core values of the Honors Program indirectly. However, they are directly related to the following core values: integrity, academic rigor, and building community and appreciating diversity. By observing, critiquing, and attending public presentations, students will enrich their communication skills as audience members and listeners generally. This builds integrity as students gain appreciation for the shared experience of speakers and listeners. Academic rigor is encouraged and tested through the evaluation of the speech critique assignments. Expectations will be high, but intellectual development will be encouraged through the feedback process. Finally, students will build community and encounter diversity via the latter two speech critique assignments, in particular. They will be challenged to get to know their campus and surrounding Wilkes communities by attending a live public presentation outside of the classroom. As they explore and analyze speeches that fall outside of the “great speech” mold, they will encounter diverse voices and perspectives that will contribute to a greater understanding of multiculturalism and inclusion in speech contexts. Honors Assignments: Because we are not afforded extra time for additional speech presentations in class, Honors assignments will take the form of written papers. Students seeking honors credit for the course will complete three speech analyses and critiques, approximately 2-4 pages in length, using the “traditional” criteria of the five canons of rhetoric as the basis for their analyses. These assignments will be worth a total of 200 additional points. Thus, Honors students will be graded out of 1200 points, rather than 1000 points, as stated in the standard syllabus. 

CS 328 &H - Algorithms/Honors- Bracken B 

  • The Honors component involves an additional programming assignment that is much more challenging than the other four programming assignments submitted by the general class. In addition to developing this algorithm, a fifteen minute presentation to the class on how the algorithm works and why it can be done this way is required. In addition to that, Honors students will be required present the solutions to the class after their graded homework has been returned. The student will be leading the class, writing the solutions on the board and answering questions. The homework assignments are usually mathematical proofs of the analysis of the algorithm type that is the topic of the chapter.

DAN 210 &H - Modern Dance I - Esgro L

  • Description not provided.

EC 102 &H - Principles of Econ II/HONORS - Seeley R

  • The course presents basic economic concepts such as opportunity cost, comparative advantage and supply and demand.  It provides an introduction to microeconomics focusing on: the efficiency of markets versus government interventions; the importance of competition in the functioning of markets; consumer behavior; labor markets and differences in earnings; the incidence and real cost of taxes; public policy regarding pollution; and free trade versus protectionism. Honors students: Write two papers that account for 10% of final grade.

ED 324 &H - Children's Literature/HONORS - Polachek D

  • Emphasis is placed on the instructional methods that incorporate the use of literature across the curriculum with attention given to the selection of books to match the instructional levels of young readers. This course presents literature as a powerful tool to enhance effective integrated teaching and learning across the curriculum. For Honors students enrolled in ED 324/326, an additional, rigorous assignment is required to demonstrate critical thinking reflection, analysis, and synthesis—and writing skills. This assignment involves planning, researching, and writing a scholarly paper relevant to the content presented in ED 324/326: Children’s and Adolescent Literature. The student is required to identify a possible paper topic and conference with the professor for topic approval as well as to discuss the details of the paper. Within this paper, students are required to include perspectives and viewpoints addressing the selected topic, while supporting them with information acquired from both the course as well as additional outside resources. Students must utilize proper and headings and subheading for organizational purposes. This paper should be six to eight pages in length, not including the cover page and References page. Students must include at least five scholarly sources published within the last five years.

ED 345 &H - Assessment in Education - McHenry D

  • Description coming soon.

ENG 233 &H - Survey of English Liter. - Hamill T

  • This course offers a survey of major English literary works and movements from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. In addition to attending to changes in the English language and its wide ranging literary forms across this extensive period, the class will consider the broader social, economic, political, religious, and material forces that helped to shape – and that were shaped by – the texts we study. As this course follows a survey format, our daily work will balance lecture with group discussion, with an eye toward wide-ranging coverage of major works and deep engagement of our selected texts. Honors students: Intensified research and writing components to essays and the annotated bibliography.

ENG 342 &H - Studies in Shakespeare - Hamill T

  • This course provides an intensive introduction to and survey of the works of William Shakespeare, with a particular emphasis on Shakespeare’s career and literary output as a playwright.  As we read through the Shakespeare canon we study the social, religious, and political contexts of the early modern period during which Shakespeare’s works emerged, and we will consider the varying ways in which Shakespeare (as we know him) was at once a product and a producer of that culture. Honors students: Create a longer paper with more sources and present that paper at a conference (or on campus).

ENV 305 &H - Solid Waste Management - Karnae S 

  • The course presents the concepts related to solid waste, engineering and management strategies. It provides introduction to solid waste sources; characterization and generation rates; collection and transportation technologies and management options; sanitary landfill design and operation; integrated solid waste management strategies and technologies. Honors students will work on an individual project designing a solid waste management facility implementing the biological, chemical or thermal processes learnt in class. The deliverables will include a detailed report with design calculations and feasibility assessment.

FYF 101 H - Leadership through Writing - McLaughlin J

  • Honors students take a special creative writing-based FYF class that develops collaborative community while cultivating skills in writing, speaking, problem-solving, and critical thinking as well as a comfort with encountering the ambiguous, uncertain and/or unfamiliar.

HL 353 &H - HR Mgm't in Serv Indus/HONORS - Lee H

  • Honors students will be required to write an individual case study and an individual human resources topic paper. Honors students will analyze an assigned case after visiting a hospitality organization. The analysis will be 3-4 pages. Also, they will write a research paper on one of the human resource management topics we discuss in class. Each student will select his or her own topic and write an 8-10 page research paper that covers the history of the topic, current theories and trends. Students will select different topics and work individually on their research paper.

HNR 390 A - Honors Seminar - McLaughlin J 

  • This one-credit interdisciplinary capstone seminar serves as a culminating experience for all prospective Honors Program graduates.  The course is intended to explicitly engage students in reflection on what they have learned at Wilkes and how they can advance those skills and insights along their future personal and professional trajectories. Consequently, the course depends on students’ consistent investment in critically assessing what they have learned during their undergraduate education, how that can be communicated to others, and what that makes possible for future endeavors. In addition to Wilkes University’s core values of mentorship, scholarship, diversity, innovation, and community, the Honors Program also looks to instill the following values in its students: leadership, integrity, self-awareness, and academic distinction.  Consequently, such values integrally inform the work of this seminar.

HNR 390 B/C - Honors Seminar - Kuiken J

  • This one-credit interdisciplinary capstone seminar serves as a culminating experience for all prospective Honors Program graduates.  The course is intended to explicitly engage students in reflection on what they have learned at Wilkes and how they can advance those skills and insights along their future personal and professional trajectories. Consequently, the course depends on students’ consistent investment in critically assessing what they have learned during their undergraduate education, how that can be communicated to others, and what that makes possible for future endeavors. In addition to Wilkes University’s core values of mentorship, scholarship, diversity, innovation, and community, the Honors Program also looks to instill the following values in its students: leadership, integrity, self-awareness, and academic distinction.  Consequently, such values integrally inform the work of this seminar.

HST 341 &H - British History/Honors - Kuiken J

  • Honors students will be required to produce a longer and more comprehensive research paper.  This will include additional assignments such as the production of a historiography paper and the production of a full rough draft.  Honors students will also be encouraged to submit their final papers to the Phi Alpha Theta History Honors Society regional conference. 

HST 354 &H - Age of Revolut/Glob Cont/HONOR - Shimizu A 

  • Honors students will create a research proposal, a detailed outline, and a Primary Source presentation, as well as a longer research paper.

LAT 101 &H - Elementary Latin I/HONORS - Mihailoff A

  • Latin 101 is an introduction to the Latin language. Through word study and readings, students acquire a basic Latin vocabulary, an understanding of grammatical concepts, and a familiarity with selected ancient Roman authors. This course is designed with one of its primary aims being for students to acquire a broad lexicon of Latin roots which can then be productive in their own vocabularies. Honors students: Keep a weekly log (handwritten!) of technical academic vocabulary and or interesting words which they find in their readings for other classes. The log should be a notebook which is separate from their Latin notebook. Each Friday the honors student will submit to the instructor five logged words along with their definitions and etymologies (word histories).

ME 231 &H - Statics - Baddour C

  • This course covers the fundamental concepts of engineering based mechanics relating to forces acting on rigid bodies. Honors students: There will be three to four projects for the students to complete. These projects will be in addition to the standard course work. The projects will count for 15 to 20% of the final grade.

MGT 358 &H - International Business - Taylor W

  • Honors students submit a 15 to 20 page research paper.

MKT 221 &H - Marketing -  Xiao C

  • MKT221 Marketing is an introduction to the planning and activities of marketing. Emphasis on budgeting, product conception and development, pricing, distribution channels and promotion. The course will provide an understanding of the dynamic role marketing plays in the global and national economy as well as the organization.  You will have the opportunity to build a knowledge base about the following areas: strategic marketing, marketing research, consumer behavior, segmentation and targeting, marketing mix planning, implementation and evaluation.  We will identify marketing challenges and ethical thinking. Honors students: Harvard Business School Case Study Assignment.

MTH 114 &H - Calc/Mod for Bio/Health Sci/&H  - Young B 

  • Honors students will have additional take-home assignments which will extend and deepen their understanding of using calculus in biological modeling. Some assignments will use Wolfram Mathematica to visualize concepts and enable more complicated calculations than are possible by hand. Others will involve additional models and examples beyond those presented in the regular 114 class. The honors students may also be asked to serve as group leaders in group problems sessions during class.

NSG 242 &H  - Nur Care Child Rearing Fam/HON - Cook M

  • No description provided.

NSG 321 &H  - Population Health - Nwabueze U

  • This course utilizes the nursing process in providing a foundation in population health, including community and population assessment, interve3ntion, and evaluation of culturally diverse and vulnerable populations. Course Goal for Honors Students: Through the cultivation of the spirit of inquiry, Honors students will analyze various readings and multiple media depicting population health and apply it to established nursing theories. Honors students will endeavor on a philosophical journey of inquiry in nursing where they will critically assess the relevance of a well- known nurse theorist or historical nurse to a 21st century population health issue. An example may be caring for diverse populations utilizing culture care theory of diversity and universality )aka transcultural theory). By the end of the course, students will submit a paper/article to a peer reviewed journal for possible publication. This activity aspires to foster appreciation for nursing scholarship, recognition of the importance of quality care an instilling the love of lifelong learning.

NSG 342 &H - Intro. to Nurs. Research - Victor J 

  • The research process is examined in this course. Emphasis is on studies in nursing which provide a foundation for critical reflection on research reports and application of findings to practice. This course meets the Oral Presentation Option (OPO) at the University. Honors students: Participate in research through engagement in data collection and data entry, as well as in dissemination.

PHA 308 &H - Pharm & Health Care Del/HONORS - Roke-Thomas M

  • Examination of health and pharmaceutical delivery in the U.S. conducted from a societal perspective. Emphasis is on public policy, economic behavior, and outcomes. Application will be made to various pharmaceutical sectors (e.g., retail, health, systems, manufacturing). Students should gain an understanding of the factors driving transformation of health care delivery and the implications for future pharmacy practice. Honors students: Complete a 5-page paper (or word count) on the role of pharmacists in the health care system, and spend two hours at the VIM (Volunteers in Medicine Clinic).

PHA 311 &H - Pharmaceutics I - Jacobs H 

  • Pharmaceutics I is the first of a two-course sequence in Pharmaceutics, providing a foundation in physical chemistry for the pharmaceutical science. Pharmaceutics I will focus on a review of organic functional groups, carbohydrate chemistry, an introduction into polymer chemistry, and a review of fatty acids/surfactants. We will also review ionic equilibrium and acid base properties. This introduction will serve as a solid foundation to present further discussion on other physiochemical properties pertaining to pharmacy and pharmaceutical dosage forms. Honors students: PHA 311 (Pharmaceutics I) comprises both a laboratory and didactic section focusing on the physical/chemical properties of chemicals and drugs.The “honors” student will be utilized as TA’s for their lab. The honors students will meet with me to review and perform the lab. The student will then be responsible for guiding, coordinating, and helping the student in the lab experience. In addition, the honors students to help improve the assignments by doing the labs before the general student lab.

PHA 327 &H - Medical Microbiology/HONORS  - Bomareddy 

  • Medical Microbiology will provide the foundations necessary for application of the discipline to the basic and clinical sciences. The course is divided into three basic parts. Part I of the course will prepare students to understand the basics of bacteria and the concepts behind bacterial infection. Part II will prepare students to understand the basics of viruses, fungus and other disease causing microorganisms. Part III will give students an overview of how microorganism plays a role in modern pharmaceutical manufacturing. Honor students: One of two research project options: The teaching of medical microbiology, or the specific antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections.

PHA 488 &H - Aspects Caring for Pain/HON - Franko 

  • This course is an interactive and interprofessional approach to the assessment and treatment of pain. Various innovative teaching and learning strategies will allow students to develop and appreciate a comprehensive understanding of the social, psychological, physical, spiritual and ethical implications of pain. Students will be exposed to a holistic approach to the treatment of various pain scenarios including acute/chronic pain, palliative care, hospice, substance abuse and addiction. Honors students: Complete a scholarly project suitable for presentation at a national conference and/or publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

PHL 298 &H - Science and Society - Zarpentine C

  • The COVID 19 pandemic has dramatized the complex relationship between science and society: we have seen an unprecedented mobilization of scientists to combat the virus, which has produced a safe and highly effective vaccine in record time; at the same time, many remain skeptical of the vaccine, of public health measures, even of the existence of the virus itself. Science is often held up as authoritative it matters of fact, yet scientific results are the subject of doubt among many in our society. This course seeks to focus on the nature of science and its relation to society. It will address questions like: how does science work and should we trust scientific results? and explore the impact of science on society as it relates to issues in genetics, the environment and public health. Honors students complete a White Paper Assignment.

PS 111 &H - Intro. to American Government -  Maierean A

  • The course will explore and evaluate American Politics. We will examine important topics such as the nature and origins of our Constitution, the history of civil rights movements and the processes and institutions of United States government and politics. In addition to identifying the rules and branches of our government, the course will also analyze the evolution of government from the founding to the modern era. Honors students: As an honors supplement to the PS 111 course, honors students will be required to do additional reading, research and to write an additional research paper. They will also meet with the instructor approximately three (3) times during the semester for tutorial sessions and discussions on the E.J. Dionne book "Our Divided Political Heart."

PS 151 &H -Intro Comparative Politics/HON -  Miller A

  • This course is an introduction to the study of the politics and government of selected foreign countries. The course will begin with the examination of the various structures and concepts of government around the world and their regional variations. Honors students: The student will be expected to write a 15 page research paper with three revisions in consultation with the instructor.

PSY 101 H - General Psychology I/HONORS- Tindell D

  • Psychology 101 is a broad survey course of the entire field of psychology. In this course you should gain a better appreciation for the breath of the field and the research that is currently being conducted. The topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to, physiological psychology, perception, learning, memory, language, human development, personality and psychopathology. The course will focus on how research is conducted in each area of psychology and what conclusions can be drawn from that research. Honors only class.PSY 311 &H - Behavioral Neuroscience - Schicatano E

PSY 311 &H - Behavioral Neuroscience - Schicatano E

  • A study of the physiological mechanisms mediating behavior and cognition. Emphasis on the structure and function of the nervous system and the neurophysiological bases of sensory processes, emotion, abnormal behavior, sleep, learning and memory, pain, and drug abuse. Laboratory experience includes brain dissection and psychophysiological techniques employed in human behavioral neuroscience research. Honors students: Spend one week at the end of the semester using some of the modalities provided by the NeuroTraining & Research Center (in Breiseth 214), and propose a study in which use use one of the training modalities (Biofeedback or Audiovisual entrainment) to produce change in participants.

SP 398 &H - T:Adv Conversation/HONORS - Bianco S

  • Besides the regular reading and the textbook, honors students will have additional reading on scholarly articles based on feministic topics and sections of Simone De Beauvoir’s book “The Second Sex.”  The final paper will be longer than the other students’ with greater in-depth research.  Articles will focus on the theme that the honors students are interested in researching for the final papers.

Honors students must adhere to the following terms to remain eligible to participate in the program, to retain access to the program’s resources and opportunities and, ultimately, to meet all Honors Program completion requirements:

FYF 101 H – Honors First-Year Foundations – 3.0 Credits

Incoming Honors students take a special creative-writing based FYF class that develops collaborative community while cultivating skills in writing, speaking, problem-solving, and critical thinking as well as a comfort with encountering the ambiguous, uncertain, and/or unfamiliar. Students who do not achieve a minimum grade of 2.5 for the FYF 101 Honors course in the fall will be required to take the spring 300-level Honors creative writing course. Wilkes students who have been accepted into the program as current students – after at least one semester at Wilkes - will also be required to take the spring 300-level Honors creative writing course.

HNR 390 – Honors Capstone Seminar – 1.0 Credit

This 1-credit interdisciplinary capstone seminar serves as a culminating experience for all prospective Honors Program graduates. The course is intended to explicitly engage students in reflection on what they have learned at Wilkes and how they can advance those skills and insights along their future personal and professional trajectories. Consequently, the course depends on students’ consistent investment in critically assessing what they have learned during their undergraduate education, how that can be communicated to others, and what that makes possible for future endeavors.

Student learning outcomes include

  • Communicating characteristic topics, methodologies and professional concerns.
  • Associated with their respective disciplines to non-expert audiences.
  • Collaborating with others, both within and outside of their respective disciplines, to accomplish shared goals.
  • Planning and managing long-term projects, balancing personal responsibility with coordination with team colleagues.
  • Organizing and delivering coherent presentation of work, from proposing prospective tasks to articulating evidence-based outcomes.
  • Specifying and critically assessing continuities as well as discontinuities across personal Wilkes educational trajectory and future endeavors.

18 additional honors credits, six of which must be at the 300 level or above

Study Abroad

  • A full semester abroad earns a waiver of 6 honors credits at the 300 level.
  • A summer term abroad earns a waiver of 3 honors credits at the 300 level.
  • Related independent study project (advised by instructor in relevant discipline) upon return earns 3 honors credits at the 300 level (through either fall HNR 395 or spring HNR 396).

Internships

  • One internship, either during a full semester or over a summer term, earns a waiver of 3 honors credits at the 300 level.
  • Related independent study project (advised by instructor in relevant discipline) connected to internship earns 3 honors credits at the 300 level (through either fall HNR 395 or spring HNR 396).

Minimum Cumulative GPA

  • 3.0 after two terms at Wilkes
  • 3.2 after four terms at Wilkes
  • 3.3 after six terms at Wilkes
  • 3.4 after eight terms at Wilkes/to meet all Honors Program completion requirements

A student is allowed only one grade of 2.5 in an honors course to receive honors credit. All other honors course grades must be a minimum of 3.0.

Students falling below the required cumulative GPA threshold will be given one full term to return their cumulative GPA to the minimum required.

Students are always encouraged to draw on the expertise of all Wilkes University community resources, such as academic support and health and wellness services, when encountering academic, personal or other challenges.

First-Year Honors Learning Community

All first-year honors students living on campus reside together in honors housing. This enables students to begin connecting with each other in an environment conducive to their shared values and aspirations. While you may live in the hall of your choice during your remaining years at Wilkes, many choose to continue living in community with other honors students.

Good Standing: Honors Program Community

Participating in Honors Program-sponsored activities, including meetings on campus with prominent guest speakers and engaging with prospective honors students, helps to cultivate knowledge and skills that advance intellectual, personal, and professional development, contributions to the Wilkes campus community, and post-graduate success, whether through employment or continued education. Our weekly newsletter, “The Honors Buzz,” announces these opportunities throughout the academic year.

All honors students must participate in at least one honors-sponsored activity per term. This commitment is waived during a study abroad term.

Good Standing: Student Conduct

Honors students must remain in good standing with regard to student conduct. Any student found guilty of violating university policies is also subject to review by the Honors Program Advisory Council.

Wilkes University Honors Program students are encouraged to use their Enhancement Grants to fund participation in co-curricular opportunities such as undergraduate research and professional conferences, international study experiences, independent research, and unpaid internships.

Questions about what type of funding is available to you should be directed toward the Honors Program, by a visit to the office (Stark Learning Center 120-122) or by email (jennifer.mclaughlin1@wilkes.edu). An Enhancement Grant can be used to support experiences such as international or domestic study-away, internships, or other opportunities beyond what your field of study requires.  Funding cannot be issued in cash, nor can it be used for Wilkes tuition or fees.

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