Wilkes University

Pharmacy

Pharmacy

The School of Pharmacy offers a program of professional study leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree. The purpose of the program is to prepare graduates for successful pharmacy practice in the health care environment of the twenty-first century. The U.S. health care system has been undergoing rapid, even dramatic, change. This transformation is expected by most observers to continue for some time. Those individuals and organizations responsible for the delivery of pharmaceutical care have not been and will not be sheltered from the forces of change. It becomes necessary, therefore, to provide new practitioners with the necessary knowledge base and skills required in a transformed health care system.

With the rapid transformation of health care delivery, a strong foundation in the basic sciences (e.g., pharmaceutics, pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, anatomy and physiology) remains essential while clinical knowledge (e.g., therapeutics, pharmacokinetics, and pathophysiology) and skills (e.g. physical assessment, patient counseling, clinical decision-making) become even more important. Successful practice will demand an improved understanding of the social sciences (e.g., psychology, sociology, economics, health policy, management). Most importantly, the future pharmacy practitioner must have outstanding interpersonal skills. Among these are the abilities to communicate effectively and to function in a team environment. 

Our vision is to develop meaningful interprofessional education (IPE) activities where all students participate in both experiential and didactic settings. Through IPE, students understand the roles and responsibilities of health care professionals that are essential to patient care, gain first-hand experience in interdisciplinary collaboration, and develop their own individual professional identity as part of a larger team.  These competencies are designed so that graduating students are trained to work as a team in optimizing patient health and outcomes. The goal of the IPE curriculum is to provide students with a set of skills and attitudes necessary to practice in an interprofessional environment.

While knowledge and skills are essential, we also ensure that our students develop as responsible citizens with highly professional demeanors who advocate, serve, care, and lead.

Our Mission

Our mission is to develop pharmacists who will provide high quality health care and to make meaningful contributions to the science and practice of pharmacy.

Our Vision

We will be recognized as an exceptional pharmacy program through innovative education, contemporary practice, and valuable scientific contributions.

Our Values

Teamwork. Professionalism. Lifelong Learning. Cultural Competency. Personalized Attention. Community Engagement.

Accreditation

Wilkes University's Doctor of Pharmacy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education, 190 South LaSalle Street, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60603-3410, (312) 664-3575, FAX (866) 228-2631, web site: www.acpe-accredit.org.

The Doctor of Pharmacy Program

The six-year Pharmacy Program at Wilkes University consists of two components. The first is the two-year Pre-Pharmacy Program, and the second is the Professional Program.

Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program

Admission to the Pre-pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program (PPGS Enrollment Limit: up to 80)Students typically enter the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program as freshmen from high school. . Non-PPGS Wilkes students interested in transferring into PPGS during the freshman year should consult the Office of Admissions transfer coordinator for assistance. It is the policy of the Nesbitt School of Pharmacy (NSoP) to set admission standards, to evaluate the academic records, to interview if appropriate, and to reject/admit students into the PPGS program.
Minimum criteria for consideration for admission are listed below. 

A student is not required to be in the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program to be eligible to apply to the School of Pharmacy. Students may apply directly to the professional program during, or after,  their sophomore year.

Applicants for the PPGS Program must complete the online Wilkes University Application or the Common Application. If a student indicates pharmacy, additional instructions to complete the pharmacy application requirements will become available to the applicant. Minimum requirements to apply are described below. The School of Pharmacy will review these applications, and top applicants will be invited for a personal interview. Final admission into the program will be based on a thorough evaluation of students based on high school performance ( e.g. class rank, GPA, or class percentile), the Letter of Intent essay, and the results of the personal interview. Interviewed applicants not selected for immediate admission will be placed on a wait list. Qualified wait-listed students will be offered seats in the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program as seats become available. In some instances, students may not be notified of an available seat in the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program until the summer. School of Pharmacy applications for the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program are suggested to be completed by February 1. As applicants are admitted on a rolling basis, all seats may be awarded before the suggested deadline. Applicants are encouraged to complete the application process as early as possible.

Applicants should review the Technical Standards set forth by the School of Pharmacy. 

These Technical Standards describe non-academic abilities that are required for admission to, continuation in, and graduation from the School of Pharmacy to obtain a Pharm.D. degree.

Minimally, each applicant to the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat program must:

  • be a graduate of, or near graduation from, an accredited high school or academy;
  • rank in the upper half of his or her class or overall GPA of 3.0 or higher OR an overall grade percentile 80%;
  • complete the School of Pharmacy supplemental application materials, including the Letter of Intent;
  • submit three recommendation letters from teachers, employers, pharmacists, or other individuals who can provide an objective appraisal of the student's ability;
  • be prepared to discuss their knowledge of the pharmacy profession through individual research, optional shadowing experiences, or discussions with pharmacists; and
  • successfully complete an interview with the School of Pharmacy.
  • The SAT requirement is waived for pre-pharm application cycle in the 21-22 academic year in accordance with the Wilkes University freshman admission policy due to continued limited testing availability.

PLEASE NOTE: Attaining minimum academic requirements does not infer or promise either an interview or admission into the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program!

Pre-Pharmacy Program - Required Courses and Recommended Course Sequence**

First Semester

Credits

*BIO-121 – Principles of Modern Biology I

4

*CHM-113 – Elements & Compounds Lab

1

*CHM-115 – Elements & Compounds

3

ENG-101 – Composition or

 

*MTH-111 – Calculus I

4

FYF-101 – First-Year Foundations

3

Total Credits

15

Second Semester

 

*BIO-122 – Principles of Modern Biology II

4

*CHM-114 – The Chemical Reaction Lab

1

*CHM-116 – The Chemical Reaction

3

Distribution Requirements

6

ENG-101 – Composition or

 

*MTH-111 – Calculus I

4

Total Credits

18

Third Semester

Credits

*CHM-231 – Organic Chemistry I*** and CHM-233 Organic Chemistry I lab***

4

*COM-101 – Fundamentals of Public Speaking

3

Distribution Requirements

6

*EC-102 – Principles of Economics II

3

Total Credits

16

Fourth Semester

 

*CHM-365 Medical Biochemistry or *CHM-232 Organic Chemistry II and CHM-234 Organic Chemistry II Lab ***

4

Distribution Requirements

6

*MTH-150 – Elementary Statistics

3

*PHY-174 – Appls. of Classical & Modern Physics

4

Total Credits

17

*Denotes prerequisite course.
**Some requirements may be fulfilled via satisfactory achievement on advanced placement tests or Wilkes' challenge examinations.
***Four credits of *CHM-235: Essentials of Organic Chemistry and  Essentials of Organic Chemistry lab *CHM-237 may be substituted for  8 credits of Organic I/II lecture and Organic I/II labs CHM-231 / CHM-233 / CHM-232 / CHM-234

Pharmacy Professional Program

The Professional Program is four years and leads to the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree. Graduates of the program are eligible for state examination to become licensed pharmacists after completing appropriate internship hours. The four years of education consist of three years of in-class (i.e., lecture, laboratory, discussion group) introductory pharmacy experiences and one final year of advanced experiential education.

Admission to the Professional Program (Enrollment limit: 62)

To be admitted into the Professional Program of the School of Pharmacy, a student must have either enrolled in and successfully completed the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program at Wilkes University as outlined above or have submitted a successful application to the School of Pharmacy.

I. Admission through the Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program

Students enrolled in the Wilkes University Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program who meet ALL of the following conditions are directly admitted to the Professional Program.

  • You must complete four semesters as a full-time pre-pharmacy student and complete all prerequisite courses within 2 years. All prerequisites must be completed by the end of the spring semester prior to admission.
  • A maximum of 8 credits for prerequisite courses may be transferred to Wilkes University while enrolled in the Pre-Pharmacy Program. The Registrar Office will determine course equivalency for transferred courses.  The remaining prerequisite courses must be completed at Wilkes University.  Prerequisite courses taken must include 8 credits of general chemistry, 8 credits of organic chemistry OR 4 credits of Essentials of Organic Chemistry at Wilkes University, 4 credits of general physics, 8 credits of general biology, 4 credits of calculus, 3 credits of elementary statistics, 3 credits of microeconomics and 3 credits of oral communications.  High school advanced placement test scores or dual enrollment courses may be accepted in fulfillment of some of these requirements.  These courses will not be counted in the 8 credit transfer maximum for prerequisite courses.  The Admissions Office can provide the list of eligibility requirements for AP credit.
  • You must achieve a prerequisite cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in the prerequisite courses listed above by the end of spring in your fourth semester (sophomore year).  Grades for the prerequisite courses transferred to Wilkes University will be included in the School of Pharmacy prerequisite cumulative GPA but only course credit will appear on the Wilkes transcript.
  •  Failure to achieve your prerequisite cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better in the prerequisite courses listed above by the end the spring in your fourth semester (sophomore year) will result in forfeiting your guaranteed seat.

  •  You must earn grades of 2.0 or greater in all prerequisite courses.  One prerequisite course grade of less than 2.0 may be repeated. If the course is repeated at Wilkes the new grade will be used to calculate your overall and prerequisite GPA. If the course is repeated at another approved institution the new grade will only be used in your prerequisite GPA calculation by the School of Pharmacy, but only credits will appear on your official University transcript. Your original grade will remain on your transcript for University purposes including overall GPA calculation.  Prerequisite courses must be recorded with a grade of 2.0 or greater by the end of the spring semester prior to admission.  Earning a grade of less than 2.0 in a prerequisite course that cannot be repeated by the end of the spring semester prior to admission will result in forfeiture of the guaranteed seat.

    Earning two or more prerequisite course grades less than 2.0, even if one is successfully repeated, will result in forfeiting your guaranteed seat.

  • You must maintain a cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 or better in all courses taken.  Although non-prerequisite course credit hours may be transferred to Wilkes from other colleges, you should be aware that grades do not transfer for these courses. Grades for the General Education courses transferred to Wilkes University will not be included in the School of Pharmacy overall cumulative GPA and only course credit will appear on the Wilkes transcript.

  • Failure to achieve a cumulative overall GPA of 3.0 or better in all courses taken through the spring of your fourth semester (sophomore year) will result in forfeiting your guaranteed seat.

  • If you feel you can complete ALL prerequisite courses and all except two General Education courses by the end of your spring freshman semester, or you have extenuating, non-academic, circumstances that will prevent you from completing the program within two years, you should contact your advisor and the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs to discuss the appeal process and possibly obtain a modified Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat contract detailing the conditions for admission.

  • You must maintain the highest levels of academic and personal honesty and be free from criminal or drug/alcohol related offenses throughout the pre-pharmacy and pharmacy program.

     Students caught in the act of cheating, collusion, plagiarism or other and all acts in violation of the Wilkes University policy on Intellectual Responsibility and Plagiarism or the Student Code of Conduct may be subject to dismissal from the Pre-pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program.

  • You must receive a favorable recommendation from your pre-pharmacy advisor at the end of your Spring sophomore semester.

    Failure to receive a favorable recommendation from your pre-pharmacy advisor will result in forfeiting your guaranteed seat.

  • You must meet all the criteria set forth in the Technical Standards Document.

      Failure to meet the criteria set forth in the Technical Standards Document may delay or prevent graduation from the Nesbitt School of Pharmacy.

     
    A maximum of two uncompleted General Education Curriculum requirements will be considered for admission into the Professional Program in Pharmacy. Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat students with more than two uncompleted General Education courses may appeal to the Student Affairs Committee of the School of Pharmacy for consideration. There is no room in the Pharmacy Curriculum to complete General Education requirements. General Education Curriculum requirements may be completed at other accredited colleges or universities and transferred into Wilkes University with proper approval.

Students in the Wilkes University Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat Program who do not meet these conditions must compete for available seats in the Professional Program through the application process.

II. Admission through the Application Process

Faculty reserve the right to select from among the applicants who will have the best opportunity to complete the curriculum within four years and have productive professional lives. Admission is based upon the student’s academic ability as reflected in pre-requisite and overall GPA, grades from Pre-Pharmacy courses, number of courses repeated, typical course loads, total academic career, and references, as well as a successful interview. If applicable, the committee will also consider the most recent academic performance for those non-traditional students returning to college life after a hiatus. Each spring, a select group of applicants is invited for an interview, based upon a complete evaluation of all submitted application materials. Any missing documentation will compromise the application. 

The number of seats in the professional program available through the application process is dependent on the number of Pre-Pharmacy Guaranteed Seat students able to claim a seat. A portion of remaining seats are available on an academically competitive basis to Wilkes Students with overall and prerequisite GPAs above a 2.5, and a portion of seats is available to direct professional applicants that are non-Wilkes transfer students with overall and prerequisite GPAs above a 2.5 on a competitive basis. To be classified as a Wilkes student, the student 1) must complete and be enrolled at Wilkes University for two full-time consecutive semesters before enrollment in the Professional Program AND 2) must complete 18 credits of prerequisite courses at Wilkes University by the end of the spring semester prior to enrollment in the Professional Program. Failure to meet both of these criteria will result in classification as a "transfer student."

Applicant should review the Technical Standards set forth by the School of Pharmacy, which are available here.

These Technical Standards describe non-academic abilities that are required for admission to, continuation in, and graduation from the School of Pharmacy to obtain a Pharm.D degree.

Pharmacy Professional Program – Minimum Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the Professional Program of the School of Pharmacy, the applicant

  • should complete the Wilkes University General Education course requirements or have completed a baccalaureate degree. A maximum of two deficient General Education courses will be considered for admission into the pharmacy program. Students with more than two deficient General Education courses may appeal to the Student Affairs Committee of the School of Pharmacy for consideration;
  • By the end of the spring semester prior to admission, Professional Program applicants must earn:
    • a grade of C (2.0) or better in each of the Pharmacy Prerequisite Courses listed below. Prerequisite grades of less than 2.0 may be repeated and the higher grade will factor into the GPA.
    • cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better for Pharmacy Prerequisite Courses listed below
    • an overall GPA of 2.5 or better for all courses (Pharmacy Prerequisite, General Education, etc.)     
      • preferential consideration will be given to non-Wilkes professional applicant students with GPAs of 3.0 or higher;
      • We will evaluate the grades of higher-level courses to include in the GPA calculations.     
      • Applications will be placed at a lower priority if grades less than 2.0 in prerequisite courses are remediated and recorded.
  • Students repeating fewer than 4 or more prerequisite courses will be given preference during the application process.
  • Repeating courses in which a grade above a 2.0 was earned will not factor into the GPA.
  • However, exceptions to the above rules will be considered on an individual basis and only if students can provide written explanation of extenuating circumstances;
    • must maintain the highest levels of academic and personal honesty and be free from criminal/drug-related offenses throughout the pharmacy program.
    • Students caught in the act of cheating, collusion, plagiarism, or other and all acts in violation of the Wilkes University policy on Intellectual Responsibility and Plagiarism or the Student Code of Conduct may be subject to dismissal from the Pharmacy program;
    • Students will be required to submit, and clear per site requirements, for various types of criminal background checks annually, and as specified by external practice sites. Violations may result in prevention or delays in graduation;
  • must meet all the criteria set forth in the Technical Standards Document. Failure to meet the criteria set forth in the Technical Standards Document may delay or prevent graduation from the Nesbitt School of Pharmacy;
  • must provide three completed recommendation forms;
  • must successfully complete the interview process;
  • must demonstrate acceptable written communication skills

    NOTE: Admission into the Professional Program in Pharmacy is extremely competitive. Earning the minimum academic criteria necessary to submit an application does not in any way infer or promise an interview or admission into the program.

Pharmacy Professional Program – Prerequisite Courses

  • Two semesters (8 credits) of General Chemistry with labs
  • 4 credits of CHM-235 Essentials of Organic Chemistry, and CHM-237 Essentials of Organic Chemistry lab, at Wilkes University OR Two semesters (8 credits) of Organic Chemistry I/II with Organic Chemistry I/II labs 
  • Two semesters (8 credits) of General Biology with labs
  • One semester (3-4 credits) of General Physics with lab
  • One semester (4 credits) of Calculus
  • One semester (3 credits) of Statistics
  • One semester (3 credits) of Microeconomics
  • One semester (3 credits) of Oral Communications

III. Pharmacy Organization

Professional Standards
Students enrolled in the program of the School of Pharmacy are expected to endorse professional standards by subscribing to the Oath of the Pharmacist. Students are also expected to abide by the American Pharmacists Association’s Code of Ethics of the Profession.

Technical Standards
Students applying to and enrolling in the School of Pharmacy are expected to read, acknowledge, and understand the Technical Standards. These Technical Standards describe non-academic abilities that are required for admission to, continuation in, and graduation from the School of Pharmacy to obtain a Pharm.D. degree.

A candidate must have abilities and skills in the following five areas: 1) observational skills; 2) communication skills; 3) motor skills; 4) intellectual, conceptual, integrative, and quantitative skills; and 5) behavioral and social skills. Detailed descriptions of the Technical Standards are provided in the School of Pharmacy Application or by contacting the School of Pharmacy Dean's office.

Progression Requirements
All students in the Professional Program of the School of Pharmacy are required to meet minimum standards for progression. Academic progression requirements include a minimum semester and cumulative pharmacy GPA of 2.0. In addition, no student shall be allowed more than three courses with less than 2.0 grades in required professional courses both inside and outside of the school. Any course with a grade of 0.0 must be repeated. At the end of each semester the progress of each student in the Professional Program will be reviewed. Students failing to meet minimal academic standards at the end of any semester must petition the Student Review Subcommittee through the Assistant Dean of Student Affairs to progress further in the School. More inclusive policies, including, but not limited to, Technical Standards, acceptable classroom and experiential site behavior, alcohol and substance abuse, and other issues impacting the image of the professional program and the student, adopted within these guidelines are distributed annually to all students in the Nesbitt School of Pharmacy Student Handbook. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPE) progression is described in the APPE Course Manual.

The Nesbitt School of Pharmacy (NSoP) does not replace grades for courses in which a 2.0 or higher passing grade has been earned. If the first time taking a course results in a passing grade of 2.0 or higher, this grade will be used to calculate prerequisite and overall GPA for all purposes in the NSoP  This policy applies to the pre-professional and professional programs.

Experiential Curriculum Component
Experiential learning is a critical component of the curriculum at Wilkes. Before being placed in an experiential setting, or participating in patient care (and repeated at varying intervals), all students are required to:

  • possess an active Pennsylvania Pharmacy Intern License (comply with ACT 31 relating to CHILD ABUSE RECOGNITION AND REPORTING);
  • possess professional liability insurance;
  • have documentation of immunizations, and or immunity by titer if required by sites;
  • pass a physical examination;
  • be certified in Basic Cardiac Life Support (healthcare provider), Basic First Aid, and complete OSHA training;
  • have a criminal background check completed and clear per site requirements, by an approved provider when required; and
  • complete and clear other site-specific requirements, such as FBI fingerprint check, PA child abuse background check, etc.
  • Carry personal/medical health insurance

These criteria are fully described throughout the curriculum, including deadlines and ramifications of non-compliance.

The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE)
The Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) consists of a number of different experiences. During the summer following successful completion of the P-1 year, students will complete a 2-week (80-hour) Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE I). The second professional year, the P-2 year, includes 40 hours of IPPE II during the fall and/or spring semesters. In addition, students will complete a 2-week (80-hour) IPPE III during the summer following the P-2 year. In the third year of the Professional Program, the P-3 year, the curriculum includes a two-semester course in service learning and IPPE (longitudinal care) and 24 hours of IPPE IV. IPPE V is a self-directed IPPE and consists of 20 hours of independent pharmacy-related, service-oriented learning earned during the P1 through P3 years. Other discreet introductory experiences, including Interprofessional Education (IPE) simulations, will be dispersed throughout the P1-P3 years.  IPPE’s occur at practice sites and in the community in the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton area, not on campus.

The Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE)
The fourth year of the Professional Program, the P-4 year, is devoted to Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE). Each student will be assigned to one six-week rotation, plus six five-week rotations, some of which may be at some distance from Wilkes-Barre. To the extent possible, the School of Pharmacy will assist in locating safe, affordable housing for APPE’s. Since patient care is a continuous activity, some experiences may be conducted outside of regular school and business hours. Note also that the APPE rotation dates do not adhere to the regular University calendar.

NOTE: The student is responsible for paying all transportation and housing costs associated with all experiential components of the curriculum, except where noted.

Graduation, Degree, and Licensure Requirements
It is the student's responsibility to comply with all graduation requirements, and it is expected that all students accepted into the Pharm.D. Program will meet regularly and frequently with their advisors to ensure timely progress toward their Doctor of Pharmacy degree. Graduation is dependent on successful completion of all required and elective course requirements in the School of Pharmacy (see Progression Requirements) AND completion of all General Education Requirements mandated by Wilkes University.

A student entering the Professional Program with a bachelor's degree from a four-year accredited U.S. college or university is exempt from the University's General Education Requirements, but is not exempt from the prerequisite entry requirements prescribed by the School of Pharmacy for entry into the Professional Program. Students applying with degrees or courses from foreign Colleges or Universities will be evaluated to ensure significant portions of the General Education Requirements are satisfied.

All non-degreed students entering the Professional Programs are encouraged to complete the General Education Requirements prior to beginning the Professional Curriculum. As mentioned, a student may be deficient in two General Education Requirements and be granted admission into the program. Students will receive consultation and documentation from their advisor that these courses must be completed prior to graduation. Students with more than two deficient General Education courses may appeal to the Student Affairs Committee of the School of Pharmacy for consideration. This requirement is in place since there is limited room within the professional curriculum, including summers, to complete the courses.

As a matter of record, non-degreed students who have successfully completed the second professional year (P-2) in the School of Pharmacy AND completed all General Education Requirements will be awarded a Bachelor of Science degree. The pass-through B.S. degree does not meet eligibility requirements for licensure as a pharmacist; it is only intended to acknowledge the academic achievement of students completing four years of university-level education.

Pharmacy licensure is governed by state law. All states require graduation from an accredited School or College of Pharmacy. Additional requirements for licensure should be requested from the state in which licensure is sought. It is the student's responsibility to fulfill all requirements for the state in which they seek licensure. Students must contact that State Board of Pharmacy for all appropriate paperwork. For further information, please contact the Dean's Office in the School of Pharmacy.

The School of Pharmacy reserves the right to revise the Pharmacy Curriculum at any time in order to prepare students for future practice roles, meet new accreditation requirements and to incorporate innovations in instruction.

Doctor of Pharmacy Program - Required Courses and Recommended Course Sequence for the Professional Program

P-1 Fall Semester

PHA-301 Found. of Pharm. Practice I

2

PHA-308 Pharm. and Health Care Delivery

3

PHA-311 Pharmaceutics I

4

PHA-313 Pharm. Calculations

1

PHA-327 Medical Microbiology

3

PHA-331 Anatomy & Physiology I

4

Total Credits

17

P-1 Spring Semester

PHA-302 Pharmacy Care Lab I

1

PHA-304 Found. of Pharm. Practice II

2

PHA-310 Clinical Research Design

3

PHA-312 Pharmaceutics II

4

PHA-332 Anatomy & Physiology II

4

PHA-365 Medical Biochemistry*** or Elective 

2-4

PHA-360 Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience I

0

Total Credits

16-18

P-1 Summer

PHA-335*  IPPE I*

2

P-2 Fall Semester

PHA-401 Pharmacy Care Lab II

1

PHA-405 Pharmaceutical Care Systems

2

PHA-411 Biopharm. & Clinical Kinetics

3

PHA-421** Pharmacotherapeutics I

2

PHA-423** Pharmacotherapeutics II

2

PHA-425** Pharmacotherapeutics III

3

Elective

2-3

Total Credits

15-16

P-2 Spring Semester

PHA-402 Pharmacy Care Lab III

1

PHA-410 Biotechnology/Immunology

3

PHA-412 Mgt. of Pharm. Operations

3

PHA-426** Pharmacotherapeutics IV

2

PHA-428** Pharmacotherapeutics V

4

PHA-430** Pharmacotherapeutics VI

2

PHA-440* IPPE II

1

Elective

2-3

PHA-460 Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience II

0

Total Credits

18-19

P-2 Summer

PHA-445* IPPE III

2

P-3 Fall Semester

PHA-501 Pharmacy Care Lab IV

1

PHA-503 Longitudinal Care I (Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience VI)

1

PHA-505 Pharmacy Law

2

PHA-509 Economic Evaluation of Pharm.

3

PHA-521** Pharmacotherapeutics VII

2

PHA-523** Pharmacotherapeutics VIII

4

PHA-525** Pharmacotherapeutics IX

2

Elective

2-3

Total Credits

17-18

P-3 Spring Semester

PHA-502 Pharmacy Care Lab V

1

PHA-504 Longitudinal Care II (Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience VII)

1

PHA-526** Pharmacotherapeutics X

3

PHA-528** Pharmacotherapeutics XI

2

PHA-530** Pharmacotherapeutics XII

3

PHA-532 Integrative Medicine/Nutrition

2

PHA-555* IPPE IV

.5

PHA-560* IPPE V

.5

Elective

2-3

 

15-16

*Introduction to Pharmacy Practice Experience

**Sequential Courses
***Elective may be taken if CHM-365 taken prior to P1 year

P-4 Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiential Year

 

APPE Rotations

The APPE portion of the curriculum consists of 7 rotations in various settings. One rotation is 6 weeks in duration, and the others are 5 weeks each in duration for a total of 35 credits over 36 weeks. Entry into APPEs requires successful completion of the P1-P3 curriculum in full.

There are four required APPE rotations:
PHA-510 Internal Medicine
PHA-511 Ambulatory Care
PHA-512 Community Practice
PHA-513 Health System

In addition, there are three elective APPE rotations. Information will be provided during the P-3 year.

PHA

PHA-301. & 304. Foundations of Pharmacy Practice I and II

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Fall,Spring

The purpose of this two-semester course is to provide the student with the foundational knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to practice pharmacy in the 21st century.  In particular, this course will focus on skills (communication, teamwork), attitudes and other content relevant to the practice of pharmacy.  The school’s team-focused approach to learning is emphasized throughout.  This course fulfills experiential requirements and so students will have the opportunity to interact with pharmacists and patients.  Requirement: P-1 standing. 

PHA-302. , 401, 402, 501, & 502. Pharmacy Care Lab I - V

Credits: 1 each

This five-semester sequence is designed to develop the student's ability to integrate and apply information as well as practice skills that are taught throughout the curriculum. The use of case studies, role-plays, presentations, and other active-learning strategies engages students in the learning process and requires them to synthesize information at increasing levels of complexity as the student moves through the course sequence. Requirement: P-1, P-2, or P-3 standing, as appropriate for each laboratory.

Pre-Requisites
Pre-requisites:

For PHA-401, pre-requisite is PHA-302 
For PHA-402, pre-requisite is PHA-401 
For PHA-501, pre-requisite is PHA-402 
For PHA-502, pre-requisite is PHA-501
Co-Requisites
For PHA-401, Co-requisites: PHA-421, PHA-423, and PHA-425
For PHA-402, Co-requisites: PHA-426, PHA-428, and PHA-430
For PHA-501, Co-requisites: PHA-521, PHA-523, and PHA-525
For PHA-502, Co-requisites: PHA-526, PHA-528, and PHA-530

PHA-308. Pharmaceutical and Health Care Delivery

Credits: 3

Examination of health and pharmaceutical delivery in the U.S. conducted from a societal perspective. Emphasis is on public policy, economic behavior, and outcomes. Application will be made to various pharmaceutical sectors (e.g., retail, health, systems, manufacturing). Students should gain an understanding of the factors driving transformation of health care delivery and the implications for future pharmacy practice. Lecture: three hours per week. Requirement: P-1 standing or consent of the instructor. Cross-listed with PHS-308.

Pre-Requisites
P1 standing or instructor permission.

PHA-310. Clinical Research and Design

Credits: 3

In order to apply current research to patient care activities, one must first develop the skills to interpret studies.  The purpose of this course is to learn how research studies are designed to answer specific clinical questions, and how the study design is important in interpreting the results of the studies.  Students will apply research design concepts and statistical techniques to design, critically analyze, and interpret preclinical, clinical, and economic studies of pharmaceuticals and treatment plans. Lecture: three hours per week.

Pre-Requisites
MTH-150 or equivalent and P-1 standing or consent of the instructor.

PHA-311. & PHA 312 Pharmaceutics I & II

Credits: 4

The study and application of physical-chemical principles that are necessary for the design, development, and preparation of pharmaceutical dosage forms. The study of quantitative skills necessary for an understanding of the basic and clinical pharmaceutical sciences, including skills in pharmaceutical calculations and extemporaneous preparation of dosage forms. lecture: three hours per week. Laboratory and Recitation: three hours per week. Requirement: P-1 standing or consent of the instructor. NOTE: PHA-311 is a prerequisite for PHA-312.

PHA-313. Pharmacy Calculations

Credits: 1

The common mathematical processes that a pharmacist may encounter in professional practice are covered. Interpretation of the prescription, including Latin abbreviations, will be discussed. Medical terminology and the generic name, trade name, manufacturer, and classification of the top 100 drugs will also be presented. Lecture one hour per week. Requirement: P-1 standing or permission of the instructor.

PHA-327. Medical Microbiology

Credits: 3

An overview of microbiology with special emphasis on pathogenic microbiology. Lecture: three hours per week. Requirement: P-1 standing or consent of the instructor. Cross listed with [[PHS 327]].

PHA-331. & 332. Medical Anatomy and Physiology I & II

Credits: 4
Terms Offered: Fall,Spring

In-depth principles of human anatomy and physiology as well as an introduction to pathophysiology will be presented. Lecture: Two hours per week. Recitation and Lab: two hours per week. Requirement: P-1 standing or consent of the instructor. This course is restricted to enrolled Pharmacy students. Consideration may be given to non-pharmacy students with overall GPAs of 3.0 or greater, if there is room in the lecture and lab sessions, and with instructor approval. NOTE: PHA 331 is a prerequisite for PHA 332.

PHA-335. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience I

Credits: 2

This course will provide introductory practice experience to students in the community setting. The course fosters the development of professionalism in an environment of practical application of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Students will be faced with a variety of issues practical to community pharmacy. The student will take an independent learning approach under the supervision of a practicing community pharmacist. The course is two full-time weeks (80 hours) of experience.

Pre-Requisites
Successful completion of all required courses in the P-1 year or permission of instructor.

PHA-360. Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice I

Credits: 0.5

The Self-Directed (SD)-IPPE program is made up of three courses (SD-IPPE I, II, and III) over the span of the Pl through P3 years. Collectively these courses consist of a total of 20 hours of pharmacy-related, service-oriented learning.

The Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (SD- IPPE) course is designed to expose students to various service-learning opportunities throughout their P 1 through P3 years. This experience consists of three components: participation in and development of service- learning projects, reflection, and self-directed learning. Students may develop their own experiences or participate in opportunities offered by the School or professional organizations.
Requirements for service learning hours will increase as the student progresses through the curriculum. Each student must complete a minimum of 2, 8, and 10 hours during the Pl, P2, and P3 years, respectively (total 20 hours). Additional details are provided in the SDIPPE syllabus conveniently posted in E*Value.

Pre-Requisites
P1 standing for PHA-360
P2 standing and PHA-360 for PHA-460
P3 standing and PHA-460 for PHA-560

PHA-365. Medical Biochemistry

Credits: 4

Introduction to basic biochemistry concepts, focusing on the structure and function of vitamins, proteins, and lipids as well as bioenergetics and major catabolic pathways. The catabolism of carbohydrates, fats and amino acids will be discussed including reactions and regulation. Common metabolic pathways of drugs, enzyme induction and metabolism down regulation will also be presented. Lecture: Four hours per week. Cross-listed with CHM-365, BEGR-465.

Pre-Requisites

CHM-232 or CHM-235 with a grade of 2.0 or better or permission of the instructor

PHA-405. Pharmaceutical Care Systems: Design and Control

Credits: 2

Examines delivery of pharmaceutical products and services from a systems perspective in a variety of patient care settings. Focus is upon effectiveness, efficiency, and quality. Covers design of systems, establishment and monitoring of key indicators, total quality management, and quality assurance agencies (e.g., JCAHO, NCQA). Lecture: two hours per week.

Pre-Requisites
P2 standing or instructor permission.

PHA-410. Immunology and Biotechnology

Credits: 3

A discussion of nonspecific host defense mechanisms and a detailed description of specific immunity. Products that impart artificial active and passive immunity are presented. The concept of biotechnology is discussed together with the currently available products of genetic engineering that relate to immunology. The various immunological disorders and the immunology of cancer and HIV are discussed. Lecture: three hours per week.

Pre-Requisites
PHA-331, PHA-332, PHA-365, or consent of the instructor.

PHA-411. Biopharmaceutics and Clinical Pharmacokinetics

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Fall

Biopharmaceutics and Clinical Pharmacokinetics is designed to educate pharmacy students in the principles of pharmacokinetics and biopharmaceutics and how they assist in dosage regimen design and therapeutic efficacy evaluations. The impact of the physical and chemical forms nature of the drug and dosage forms will be studied as they relate to the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination. The clinical pharmacokinetics of individual drugs will be examined with emphasis on clinical application based on patient presentations. Case studies, homework, and quizzes will be used to facilitate student learning. This course is roughly divided into two parts. The first is Biopharmaceutics/ Pharmacokinetics and the second is Clinical Pharmacokinetics.  Lecture: three hours per week.

Pre-Requisites
P2 standing, or consent of the instructor.

PHA-412. Management of Pharmacy Operations

Credits: 3

The principles of management, including personnel and financial management, will be covered as they apply to management of pharmacy operations in a variety of settings (e.g., community, health system, managed care). Lecture: three hours per week.

Pre-Requisites
PHA-308 or consent of the instructor.

PHA-421. Pharmacotherapeutics I: Principles of Pharmacology & Medicinal Chemistry

Credits: 2

This course is the 1st of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This particular course will emphasize the most fundamental concepts central to drug therapy.  A major emphasis will be placed on the interactions of drugs with their cellular targets in the human body, and the chemical properties of drugs that dictate their biological activity.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

PHA-423. Pharmacotherapeutics II: Principles of Pharmacotherapeutics

Credits: 2

This course is the 2nd of a twelve module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics. This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner. Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for understanding Pharmacotherapeutics principles.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

PHA-425. Pharmacotherapeutics III: Self-Care and Dermatology*

Credits: 3

This course is the 3rd of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of dermatological disorders and self- care issues.

Pre-Requisites
Co-Requisites

PHA-426. Pharmacotherapeutics IV: Gastrointestinal Disorders*

Credits: 2

This course is the 6th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of gastrointestinal diseases.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-428. Pharmacotherapeutics V: Infectious Diseases*

Credits: 4

This course is the 4th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of infectious diseases.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-430. Pharmacotherapeutics VI: Joint, Autoimmune and Musculoskeletal Disorders

Credits: 2

This course is the 5th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of joint, autoimmune and musculoskeletal diseases.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-435. Pharmacogenomics

Credits: 2

Students will learn to understand how human genetics and genomics can be used to provide optimized drug therapy and patient care. Learning about this emerging field will enable students to better understand and manage new genomics-based diagnostic tools and make personalized treatment choices. Students will also spend time discussing societal and ethical implications of genetic testing and the resultant individualization of drug therapy, explain basic principles of human genetics and heredity, and more. Requirement: P-3 standing.

PHA-440. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience II

Credits: 1

This course will provide introductory practice experience to students in two health care settings: prescriber’s clinics and a clinical pharmacy site. Students will have an independent approach to learning and gain a broader understanding of these settings and the role that pharmacists may play. Requirement: Successful completion of all required courses in the P-1 year, or permission of instructor.

PHA-445. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience III

Credits: 2

This course will provide introductory practice experience to students in the health-system setting. The course fosters the development of professionalism in an environment of practical application of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Students will be faced with a variety of issues practical to this area of practice. The student will take an independent learning approach under the supervision of a practicing community pharmacist. The course is two full-time weeks (80 hours) of experience. Requirement: Successful completion of all required courses in P-2 year, or permission of instructor.

PHA-450. Neuropharmacology of Drugs of Abuse

Credits: 3

In-depth analysis of drugs of abuse, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerance, sensitization, physical dependence, and effects of drug use during pregnancy. Drug testing and substance abuse treatment strategies will also be discussed. Lecture: three hours.

Pre-Requisites
PHA-421 or consent of the instructor.

PHA-452. Extemporaneous Compounding

Credits: 3

Students will achieve basic and advanced skills in compounding pharmaceutical dosage forms for individualized patient therapy to replace a lack of commercially available products and enhance therapeutic problem-solving between the pharmacist and physician to enhance patient compliance. Students will work independently on research assignments and compounding preparations. Lecture: one hour per week. Lab: six hours per week.

Pre-Requisites
PHA-311 and PHA-312 and consent of the instructor.

PHA-456. Concepts in Primary Care

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Not Currently Offered

The course is designed to allow students to explore and develop advanced knowledge and skills related to diseases and medications commonly encountered in a primary care environment. This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in ambulatory care pharmacy practice, community pharmacy, long-term care and population health management. Topics are presented in a case-based discussion format that includes multiple diseases and medications and through student-led mini topic discussions.

Pre-Requisites
P2 standing

PHA-460. Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice II

Credits: 0.5

The Self-Directed (SD)-IPPE program is made up of three courses (SD-IPPE I, II, and III) over the span of the Pl through P3 years. Collectively these courses consist of a total of 20 hours of pharmacy-related, service-oriented learning.

The Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (SD- IPPE) course is designed to expose students to various service-learning opportunities throughout their P 1 through P3 years. This experience consists of three components: participation in and development of service- learning projects, reflection, and self-directed learning. Students may develop their own experiences or participate in opportunities offered by the School or professional organizations.
Requirements for service learning hours will increase as the student progresses through the curriculum. Each student must complete a minimum of 2, 8, and 10 hours during the Pl, P2, and P3 years, respectively (total 20 hours). Additional details are provided in the SDIPPE syllabus conveniently posted in E*Value.

Pre-Requisites
P1 standing for PHA-360
P2 standing and PHA-360 for PHA-460
P3 standing and PHA-460 for PHA-560

PHA-488 . Aspects of Caring for the Pain Patient

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Fall

This course is an interactive and interprofessional approach to the assessment and management of pain. Various teaching and learning strategies will allow students to develop and appreciate the understanding of the social, psychological, physical, spiritual and ethical implications of pain.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-503 . & PHA 504. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences VI and VII: Longitudinal Care Lab I & II

Credits: 1
Terms Offered: Fall,Spring

Students will follow a patient or patients over an extended period of time in a medical or community setting. Pharmaceutical knowledge and skills will be applied in communications, health assessment, monitoring, medication management, and evaluation of both humanistic and clinical outcomes. Issues of health care including cost, access, and quality as revealed through each patient’s interaction with health and pharmaceutical care systems will be addressed. Students are responsible for transportation to and from all off-campus experiential sites.


Pre-Requisites
PHA-503 is the prerequisite for PHA-504.

PHA-505. Pharmacy Law

Credits: 2

The study of federal and state statutes, regulations, and court decisions, which control the practice of pharmacy and drug distribution. Civil liability in pharmacy practice and elements of business and contract law will be covered. Lecture: two hours per week (hybrid).

Pre-Requisites
P3 standing

PHA-506. Concepts in Infectious Disease

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Fall

This course is offered to Fall semester to P3 students and is designed to allow students to explore and develop advanced knowledge and skills related to infectious diseases. This course will be of value to pharmacy students seeking careers in infectious diseases whether it be in ambulatory care pharmacy practice, community pharmacy, long-term care and population health management. Students will be heavily leading the course through presentations, cases and poster presentations. Active learning techniques are used throughout the course to build critical thinking and problem solving skills. Emphasis is placed on the integration of disease states and approaches to practice management. Assignments that engage students in lifelong learning and community engagement are additional features of the course.

Pre-Requisites
P3 standing

PHA-509. Economic Evaluation of Pharmaceutical Products and Services

Credits: 3

Introduction to commonly used economic evaluation methods (e.g., cost-minimization, cost-utility, cost-benefit, cost-effectiveness) as applied to pharmaceutical products and services. Quality of life and outcomes research will also be explored. Emphasis is on understanding evaluation methods and research design and interpreting the relevant literature for practice applications. Lecture: three hours per week.

Pre-Requisites
PHA-308 and PHA-310 or consent of the instructor.

PHA-510. General Medicine Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

Credits: 5-6

Integration of the basic pharmacy related concepts to the delivery of pharmaceutical care in general medicine practice. Clinical practice: 40 hours per week for five to six weeks.

Pre-Requisites

Successful completion P1-P3 curriculum in full.

PHA-511. Ambulatory Care Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

Credits: 5-6

Integration of the basic pharmacy related concepts to the delivery of pharmaceutical care in ambulatory care settings. Clinical practice: 40 hours per week for five to six weeks.

Pre-Requisites

Successful completion P1-P3 curriculum in full.

PHA-512. Community Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

Credits: 5-6

Integration of the basic pharmacy related concepts to the delivery of pharmaceutical care in community practice settings. Clinical practice: 40 hours per week for five to six weeks.

Pre-Requisites

Successful completion P1-P3 curriculum in full.

PHA-513. Health System Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience

Credits: 5-6

Integration of the basic pharmacy related concepts to the delivery of pharmaceutical care in the health system settings. Clinical practice: 40 hours per week for five to six weeks.

Pre-Requisites

Successful completion P1-P3 curriculum in full.

PHA-515. Naplex Preparation

Credits: 0

This course will be provided annually to P4 students to assist in preparation for The North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX). Students will complete cumulative exams assigned by the coordinator.

Pre-Requisites
P4 standing.

PHA-521. Pharmacotherapeutics VII: Pulmonary Disorders*

Credits: 2

This course is the 7th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of pulmonary diseases.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-523. Pharmacotherapeutics VIII: Cardiovascular Disorders*

Credits: 4

This course is the 8th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of cardiovascular diseases

Pre-Requisites

PHA-525. Pharmacotherapeutics IX: Renal Disorders*

Credits: 2

This course is the 9th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of renal diseases.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-526. Pharmacotherapeutics X: Endocrine Disorders & Women's/Men's Health Issues*

Credits: 3

This course is the 10th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of endocrine diseases.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-528. Pharmacotherapeutics XI: Hematology/Oncology Diseases*

Credits: 2

This course is the 12th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of gastrointestinal diseases.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-530. Pharmacotherapeutics XII: Central Nervous System Disorders*

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

This course is the 11th of a twelve-module sequence that will integrate pharmacology, medicinal chemistry, pathophysiology and therapeutics.  This team taught course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to learn, observe and apply concepts of these four content areas in an integrated manner.  Concepts in each of these content areas will be emphasized to provide the necessary information for pharmaceutical management of CNS and mental health disorders.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-532. Integrative Medicine and Nutrition

Credits: 2

The purpose of the Integrative Medicine and Nutrition course is to help students learn to integrate nonconventional treatments (natural medicines, manipulation therapy, acupuncture, etc.) into traditional treatment strategies. Additionally, students will learn about nutrition support practices, including enteral and parenteral care. 

Pre-Requisites
PHA-331, PHA-332, PHA-365 or consent of the instructor.

PHA-534. Introduction to Hospital Pharmacy Practice

Credits: 2

This course introduces students to the practice of pharmacy within a hospital setting. Topics discussed include the accreditation process for hospitals, career options and residency or fellowship training, medication formulary management, automation and technology in hospital pharmacies, medication calculations, medication safety, clinical pharmacy practice, and sterile product preparation.

PHA-536. Principles of Advanced Community Pharmacy Management

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Not Currently Offered

This course is designed to provide a foundation for students interested in pursuing the development and implementation of advanced clinical programs in a community pharmacy. The student will be introduced to principles in pharmacy and fiscal management, professional development, and the management and legal issues relating to clinical pharmacy services. Didactic and active learning techniques will be employed throughout the course and the student will be required to develop a business plan.

Pre-Requisites
P2 standing

PHA-538. Pediatric Pharmacotherapy

Credits: 2
Terms Offered: Not Currently Offered

This course is designed to expand the student’s current knowledge base regarding the pediatric population and to introduce the core concepts involved in the care of this special population. The course prepares students to identify and address drug-related problems in pediatric patients and to demonstrate competency within those areas. This will be accomplished by completion of case scenarios, actual patient presentations, and a take-home examination. An on-site visit to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) is required. Requirement: P-2 or P-3 standing.

Pre-Requisites
P2 or P3 standing

PHA-540. Comprehensive Diabetes Management

Credits: 3

This course provides a multidisciplinary foundation for health professionals in the principles of diabetes management. Students who successfully complete the course will have knowledge and the basic skill set that is needed to begin practicing diabetes management. The majority of this course is independent self-study of online lectures, but there are mandatory on-campus discussions and exams.Requirement: P2 or P-3 standing.

PHA-544. Managed Care Pharmacy

Credits: 2

This elective is intended to help future pharmacists interested in any area of practice better understand the clinical and business decision-making processes of the health care system. The elective will introduce and reinforce the concepts of population health and value, explore tools available to limit healthcare spending, and discuss unique ways pharmacists can be involved in improving patient care. This course will be offered during the spring semester each year.

Pre-Requisites
P2 or P3 standing.

PHA-552. Principles of Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry

Credits: 3
Terms Offered: Spring

This will be an introductory course, the aims of which are to provide the principles of bioorganic and medical chemistry, including an understanding of drug structure-activity relationships, prediction of the physicochemical properties of a drug, basic knowledge of the major pathways of drug metabolism, and factors that can contribute to drug-drug interactions.

Pre-Requisites

PHA-555. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience IV

Credits: 0.5
Terms Offered: Fall

This course will provide introductory practice experience to students in the clinical telepharmacy setting. Students will gain a broader understanding of this setting and the role that pharmacists may play. Requirement: successful completion of all required courses in the P2 year, or permission of instructor.

 

Pre-Requisites
Completion of all required courses in P2 year.

PHA-556. Role of Phytochemicals on Health and Disease

Credits: 2

Students will learn the basic concepts and classification of phytochemicals present in our daily diet, followed by the study of specific phytochemicals and their relation to human health and disease. Basic mechanisms and pathways through which phytochemicals act and alter will be discussed. Students will have an opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of a specific phytochemical of their choice or any other phytochemical designated by the instructor through a research review paper and an in-class presentation.

Pre-Requisites
P2 standing.

PHA-558. Principles of Toxicology: From Beaker to Bedside

Credits: 2

This toxicology elective is designed to provide the student with introductory knowledge of the molecular mechanisms of action and clinical management of poisons.  The course will begin with introductory concepts such as history, mechanisms of cell injury and toxicant disposition.  The student will then be exposed to the fundamental principles of managing an acutely poisoned patient.  Toxicology lectures on each major organ system will prepare students for group presentations.  The aims of student presentations will be to achieve a greater understanding of the clinical management of the poisoned patient, and to hone presentation skills.  To the extent that is feasible, the course will involve lectures, or other learning experiences, led by external specialists.

The scope of poisons that will be discussed is broad, and includes environmental toxins, industrial toxicants, and drugs.  Specific agents will include heavy metals, volatile solvents, common plant toxins, rodenticides, and several drugs.  Students may be expected to participate in one laboratory exercise, wherein they will learn a fundamental method to characterize the mechanism and/or extent of cell death induced by a toxicant.

Pre-Requisites
P-2 or P-3 standing or permission of the instructor

PHA-560. Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice III

Credits: 0.5

The Self-Directed (SD)-IPPE program is made up of three courses (SD-IPPE I, II, and III) over the span of the Pl through P3 years. Collectively these courses consist of a total of 20 hours of pharmacy-related, service-oriented learning.

The Self-Directed Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (SD- IPPE) course is designed to expose students to various service-learning opportunities throughout their P 1 through P3 years. This experience consists of three components: participation in and development of service- learning projects, reflection, and self-directed learning. Students may develop their own experiences or participate in opportunities offered by the School or professional organizations.
Requirements for service learning hours will increase as the student progresses through the curriculum. Each student must complete a minimum of 2, 8, and 10 hours during the Pl, P2, and P3 years, respectively (total 20 hours). Additional details are provided in the SDIPPE syllabus conveniently posted in E*Value.

Pre-Requisites
P1 standing for PHA-360
P2 standing and PHA-360 for PHA-460
P3 standing and PHA-460 for PHA-560

PHA-561. Principles of Environmental Health for Public Health Practice

Credits: 3

Environmental health is concerned with the mechanisms by which the natural and created environment impact public health. The altered physical, chemical and biological systems will be presented from the perspectives of the population and community health. The course will focus on disease prevention, assessment and mitigation of environmental challenges to public health.

Pre-Requisites

[[PHA 564]] Crosslisted with [[PHA 310]] or permission of instructor

PHA-562. Social and Behavioral Aspects of Public Health

Credits: 3

Learners will develop public health competency in social concepts and processes that influence health status and public health interventions using the ecological approach. Targeted examination of population and individuals behaviors which influence health will utilize a range of methods necessary for behavioral change.

Pre-Requisites
[[PHA 564]] Cross-listed with [[PHA 310]] or permission of instructor

PHA-563. Public Health and Pharmacy

Credits: 3
This course will introduce students to the role pharmacists play in public health. Content will discuss the history of pharmacy and how public health was introduced into the field of pharmacy. The role of public health as it relates to the work of the pharmacy by providing education on policy, patient education and population management will also be included.
Pre-Requisites

[[PHA 564]] Cross-listed with [[PHA 310]] or permission of instructor

PHA-564. Clinical Research and Design

Credits: 3
This course focuses on the application of research design concepts and statistical techniques to design critically analyze and interpret multiple study designs.  Understanding and practicing research methods are essential for pharmacists for two reasons.  First, as a consumer of research, you will need to read and critically analyze published research.  As a member of a health care team, you will need to maintain current awareness of the existing literature and its relevance to the case at hand.  Second, as a provider of research, you will need the ability to validate your practice through scientific investigation (e.g. in the current healthcare arena it is expected that health care providers justify, through research, more of their practice).
Pre-Requisites
P1 standing or instructor permission

PHA-599. A, B and C Elective Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience Rotations

Credits: 5-6

Advanced pharmacy practice experience involved in different aspects of pharmaceutical care. (Courses to be determined.) Clinical practice: 40 hours per week for a total of five weeks.

Pre-Requisites

Successful completion P1-P3 curriculum in full.


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