Wilkes University

Revise This!

Revise This!

Spring 2019


Faculty and Alumni

 Left to right: Dr. Patrick F. Leahy (President, Wilkes University), Mary Poth (M.A. student), Dr. Nancy McKinley (Faculty Member)

The Faculty and Alumni Scholarship is Awarded

At the closing banquet of the January 2019 Residency, Dr. Nancy McKinley, fiction and creative nonfiction writer and founding faculty member, presented Mary Poth with the program’s inaugural award of the annual Faculty and Alumni Scholarship. This newly established scholarship is awarded to one or more incoming students at the M.A. level of the Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing based on a writing sample and essay submitted as part of the application materials. The scholarship recipient is determined by a three-member faculty committee who recommends students to Dr. Bonnie Culver, program director and co-founder. This scholarship is funded entirely through the generous donations of faculty and alumni. Mary is pursuing her M.A. thesis in fiction with Dr. Robert Mooney as her mentor. She is from Lovettsville, VA and joined the Wilkes community in June, 2018. Congratulations Mary Poth!

Marlon James Releases His Latest Novel

Marlon James (M.A. ‘06) is having another amazing year. His latest release, Black Leopard, Red Wolf (Riverhead Books, 2019), takes us on a fantastical ride with Tracker, a mercenary enlisted to search for a missing boy. The first novel in The Dark Star Trilogy, Black Leopard, Red Wolf has skyrocketed to the New York Times Bestseller List. James has also been featured in recent articles in The New Yorker and Vanity Fair. The critically acclaimed Wilkes alum is the author of three additional novels, including: A Brief History of Seven Killings (Riverhead Books, 2015), winner of the 2015 Man Booker Prize; John Crow’s Devil (Akashic Books, 2005), National Book Critics Circle Award finalist; and The Book of Night Women (Riverhead Books, 2009). James teaches creative writing and is the writer in residence at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota.

17th Annual Norman Mailer Society Conference

The 17th Annual Norman Mailer Society Conference will take place at Wilkes University October 10-12, 2019 with the theme: Mailer on Politics, Public Life, and Pop Culture. The Norman Mailer Society calls for papers that address any of the above categories plus those that help celebrate the 40-year anniversary of The Executioner’s Song, the 50-year anniversary of Of a Fire on the Moon, and the 60-year anniversary of Advertisements of Myself.

Conference highlights include:

  • Keynote speaker Maggie Mailer, youngest daughter of Norman Mailer
  • A reception to celebrate the opening of the Norman Mailer Room and Collection. This room, housed in the Farley Library, is a research/Mailer scholar’s dream. It is a replica of Mailer’s last studio in Provincetown that includes his private library, manuscripts and revisions, dating from 1984, and his studio furniture
  • A reading from The Time of Our Time
  • Screening of the film The Executioner’s Song
  • And more……

To submit a proposal for the conference, please e-mail the following to Maggie McKinley and Mike Lennon by June 1, 2019:

  1. 50-word biographical statement
  2. 150-200 word abstract of the proposed presentation
  3. Indication of A/V Requirements

Hotel accommodations will be at Genetti’s Best Western, Public Square, Wilkes-Barre, PA at $89 per night (from October 9 through October 13). The hotel offers free shuttle from the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton airport, hot buffet breakfast, parking, and is a two-block walk to campus. More details regarding hotel reservations and conference registration are forthcoming.

Call for Submissions: The Norman Mailer Society Graduate Writing Award

The Norman Mailer Society invites submissions for its first annual Graduate Writing Award, which recognizes high-quality graduate student work about or inspired by the work of Norman Mailer.

Eligible entries include academic papers or creative pieces composed by current graduate students. Submissions should be 10-15 pages, double-spaced, in 12 point Times New Roman font, and should be sent to: Maggie McKinley, President of the Norman Mailer Society.

The deadline is June 1, 2019

The winner of the Norman Mailer Society Graduate Writing Award receives:

  • a $500 cash award
  • a complimentary one-year membership in the Mailer Society, which includes that year’s issue of The Mailer Review
  • an opportunity to work with the editor of The Mailer Review to publish a revised version of the essay or creative piece

Executive board members of the Norman Mailer Society will evaluate all entries and notify entrants of their decision.

Graduate students are also welcome to submit proposals for the annual Norman Mailer Conference, which will be held at Wilkes University from October 10-12, 2019. Students who present at the conference will receive a $100 travel grant. Proposals for all presentations should be sent to Maggie McKinley.

Faculty News

  • Faculty member Greg Fletcher’s first YA novel, Other People’s Crazy, has finished pre-production at Northampton House Press against a publication date of June, 2019. In a high school in suburban Arizona, the biggest kid in his sophomore class is being bullied by the smallest. With no dad, best friend, or girlfriend, Brandon’s life feels like pure hopeless chaos. But thanks to his crazy single mom, a stray dog, a bronco-busting hairdresser, a random left turn, and boomerang karma from the Universe, Brandon has a chance to turn his life in a new direction. Chaos, or Choice? They’re both in the mix of crazy at Mesa Verde High. Look for it on the sale table at Barnes & Noble at this summer’s residency!
  • Beverly Donofrio is thrilled that her personal essay “Meanness,” which appeared in Brevity has been nominated for inclusion in the Best Essays of SPACE  by Brevity for 2018 Best American Essays and will be included in the Best of Brevity anthology. Her personal essay “Bad Memorial Day,” which appeared in Cagibi, has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. 
  • Jean Klein is pleased to announce that Blue Moon has licensed two productions from members of the Wilkes family so far this year. Distant Survivors, a play based on the Holocaust poetry of William Heyen (Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing Advisory Board Member), adapted by June Prager, ran for eleven performances in February at Zeider’s American Dream Theater in Virginia Beach to responsive crowds. Royal Tea, a play by Cindy Dlugolecki (M.A. ‘13) will be performed at St. Peter the Apostle High School in Alberta, Canada. (Dates TBA)

  • J. Michael Lennon will have a review-essay on the first four novels of Pottsville, PA novelist, John O’Hara, coming out in the (London) Times Literary Supplement next month. O’Hara wrote perhaps the finest novel of Southeast, Pennsylvania, Appointment in Samarra, in 1935. A classic. Also, he has a review of Philip Brady’s Phantom Signs: The Muse in Universe City forthcoming in Hippocampus.
  • Nancy McKinley’s novel-in-stories, St. Christopher on Pluto, has been accepted by West Virginia University Press, with publication slated in 2020.

     

  • Lenore Hart was recently awarded an international writing Fellowship at the Oberpfalzer Kunstlerhaus in Germany. Along with a composer and two visual artists, she will be spending six weeks as 2019’s Writing Fellow in a studio and apartment on the grounds of the residential palace built in 1890. The palace is also a museum, concert and lecture hall, and theater. The Virginia Center for the Creative Arts offers an annual exchange residency for the four varied types of artists. Lenore will arrive on June 1 and stay until July 15, working on the proposed project they accepted; a collection of contemporary short stories based on the darker original versions of German fairy tales and Greek myths. There will be an open house at the Oberpfalzer museum and their studios in the Kunstlerhaus on June 30. She is really looking forward to this total-immersion experience in a foreign setting and already desperately trying to improve her language skills!

Alumni and Student News

  • Robert Antinozzi (M.F.A. ‘14) and Alyssa Waugh (M.F.A. ‘14) started their own publishing company: Blind Faith Books. Their first anthology is entitled I AM STRENGTH: True Stories of Everyday Superwomen. Two thirds of the book's proceeds benefit No Means No Worldwide and Girls Inc. The book includes essays, poems, and art by many Wilkes alums as well as other women from all over the U.S. The second book Blind Faith published, Drowning Back to Life, a collection of poetry by Elise Emersyn, tells a story through poetry of falling in love with herself and breaking toxic cycles. They are currently accepting submissions for the next anthology: I Am More Than my Addiction. In additional news, Alyssa’s book, Hell's Laughter and Other Spooky Tales, is out in paperback and available on Amazon and her poem, "Sure" was also recently published on Writing in a Woman's Voice.
  • Caryn DeVincenti (M.F.A ’16), aka Dana Ross (pen name) had her first book, Full Girlfriend Experience, a romantic suspense novel birthed through her M.F.A classes at Wilkes, released through The Wild Rose Press on February 18, 2019. Readers can purchase it on Amazon and Barnes & Noble (online).
  • Brian Fanelli's (M.F.A. ‘10) essay, "Rethinking Early Horror Cinema: Gender, Female Empowerment, and Sexuality in Nosferatu, Frankenstein, and Bride of Frankenstein," appeared in the fall issue of Schuylkill Valley Journal, both print and online. Additionally, his interview, "Channeling the Dark Muse: An Interview with Eric Morago, Editor of Dark Ink," was published in January by the website Horror Homeroom. He also has published and forthcoming poetry in Evening Street Review, Italian Americana, and The Paterson Literary Review.
  • Patricia Florio (M.F.A. ’11) of San Fedele Press and American Writers Review was featured in an interview in the August, 2018 issue of Boston Voyager. She will also have copies of the 2018 literary anthology of American Writers Review at the NewPages table, along with information on taking 2019 submissions at the AWP Conference in Portland, Oregon.
  • Gerald J. Gurka (M.A. ’07) had his article, “Second Sunday of Lent,” published in King’s College Lenten Reflection Series Calendarfor Sunday, March 17, 2019. He is also the author and director of a new play entitled, A Holy Land Tour of the Passion, to be performed on Friday, April 12, 2019 at 7:30 p.m. in St. John’s Church, 126 Nesbitt Street, Larksville, PA. The performance is open to the public. He is currently writing “Freddie Foodmore’s Menu of Unsavory Events,” a Young Readers Story for Northampton Press.
  • Anne Henry (M.F.A ‘11) is thrilled to report that her story, “That’s It, That’s the News,” will be included in Air: A Radio Anthology published by Books by Hippocampus (coming Spring 2019). True stories from radio in its heyday! Pre-orders accepted on the website. She is also happy to announce that her story, “The Cold War,” was accepted for publication in the next issue of American Writers Review (Summer, 2019).
  • Joshua Horwitz (M.A. ‘16) has formed a media company CellCinema that helps movie makers, documentarians and activists make cinema quality productions using current model cell phones with high end audio and specialized lenses. They are currently accepting interns for the Spring/Summer.
  • Jennifer Jenkins (M.F.A. ‘17) has published "The Secret Door" in the Winter 2019 edition of Up North Lit. It is a chapter from her forthcoming novel, American Bourbon.
  • Nichole Kanney (M.F.A. '15) ran a screenwriting workshop in February to support Readathon, a fundraiser that promotes literacy for the students at Richmond Friends School. She also participated in Warp and Woof, a storytelling event for Wayne County Indiana. Nichole has joined the Wayne Writes committee, which hosts an annual weekend writing conference in the summer. Stay tuned for more!
  • Bibiana Krall (M.F.A ‘18) is among the poets chosen for the 2019 Poetry Leaves Exhibition that will be displayed on buildings, inside City Hall, and in the library during the month of May all across Waterford Twp., Michigan. The exhibition was launched in 2014 as a way to celebrate National Poetry Month. A grant from the Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs funded the project in the beginning. Bibiana’s poem “Little Universe” will also be published in an anthology later on this year. She’s just wrapped up a Writing Fellowship with Deep Center in Savannah, Georgia as a mentor in The Young Author Project where she taught Creative Writing to an incredible group of inner-city teens (Go Team Hess!) with a focus on diversity and empowerment.
  • Ginger Marcinkowski, (M.F.A. ‘11) has been chosen by Kingsbrae International Residence for the Arts (KIRA) for a month-long August residency in St. Andrews, New Brunswick, Canada. She will have the opportunity to write on the seaside property of Kingsbrae Gardens. Visiting artists are required to engage with the community and partner with Kingsbrae Garden which is located steps away from the residence and studio. Applications were open to a range of disciplines and types of artists including, the visual arts, music/composition, new media, and interdisciplinary arts. Artists from all levels in their career who exhibited a strong professional work ethic and a collaborative attitude were considered for this very competitive honor. Marcinkowski will be working on a new collection of linked short stories during her residency.
  • Vicki Mayk’s (M.F.A. ‘13) nonfiction book, The Friends of Owen Thomas (working title) will be published by Beacon Press in 2020. Her personal essay, “Dayparts,” will be included in the anthology Air, publishing in March, 2019 from Books by Hippocampus.

     

  • Sara Pisak (M.A. Student) was named a Staff Reviewer for Glass: A Journal of Poetry. Sara's review of Sonia Greenfield's chapbook, American Parable appeared online January 17 and her review of Adrienne Novy's chapbook, Crowd Surfing With God, was published in the magazine's March issue as well as online. Sara's review of Anne Graue's poetry collection, Fig Tree in Winter: Found Poetry From Sylvia Plath's The Bell Jar, was also featured in the Litstyle section of Five:2:One Magazine. Sara's work can also be found in the sixteenth issue of Boston Accent for a poetry/art collaborative feature entitled, "20/20" and "Prints."

  • Oliver Reilly (M.F.A. ‘13) was recently hired by Lehigh Carbon Community College as an instructor of Literature and Composition.
  • Joseph Schwartzburt’s (M.F.A. ’13) non-fiction piece entitled “Gavin and the Paci Pirate” was published in Akashic Books’ Terrible Twosdays Online Series on January 8, 2019.

     

  • Nisha Sharma (M.F.A. ’13) received a Library Journal starred review for The Takeover Effect, a contemporary romance releasing on April 2, 2019. The Takeover Effect is the first in a trilogy published by Avon Impulse.

  • Melanie Simms (M.A. Student) is promoting her third book, Life Signs and Fortune Cookies, published by Sunbury Press out of Mechanicsburg, PA, released in the winter of 2018. She appeared on a WVIA in an interview with Mindy Cronk on February 28, which will go out on the next Art Scene program in March. In addition, she recently appeared on ABC 27 in Harrisburg for the Author Spotlight and with Tory Gates Brown Posey Press Show. She was also selected as one of the judges in the poetry category for the Pennwriters.
  • Ora Smith (M.A. ’17) is pleased to announce the November 2018 release of her children’s picture book, A Christmas Story of Light. She will write a blog about her amazing experience writing and illustrating the book for the pre-holiday issue of The Write Life.
  • Alan N. Yount (M.A. ’18) will be part of the Tenth Anniversary Story Slam at the Woodstock Bookfest on Thursday, March 28, 2019. The theme of the Story Slam is “it’s about time,” and Alan will answer that burning question…How do you know when it’s about time to leave a sex club?

AWP 2019

The 2019 AWP Conference & Bookfair will be held at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, Oregon from March 27 – 30, 2018.

In Portland, swing by these sessions and support the Wilkes CW family, including program partners Akashic Books and Etruscan Press:

Ibrahim Ahmad (Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing and Akashic Books)

Can I Pick Your Brain? The Fine Line Between Giving Back and Getting Paid
Friday, March 29, 2018
1:30 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.
B117-119
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
The right connections in publishing can jumpstart your career and make the journey more enjoyable. But there is a fine line when asking for a favor (or a freebie) and networking. This panel looks at how emerging writers can gracefully navigate the art of "the ask" and how established authors can balance their time and effort and meaningful connections. Five publishing insiders share secrets of effective networking without looking self-interested—and when to say no without looking unsupportive.

Kazim Ali (The Disappearance of Seth, Etruscan Press)

Reinventing the Wheel: The Tradition of Innovation in Poetry
Friday, March 29, 2019
10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Portland Ballroom 256
Oregon Convention Center
Level 2
Sidney famously writes, "And others' feet still seemed but strangers in my way" ("Astrophel and Stella"). However, one would only need to read Homer, Virgil, and Dante, the letters between Wordsworth and Coleridge or Moore and Bishop, to recognize the long tradition of poets mentoring and inspiring other poets. The poets will challenge the notion that tradition and innovation are at odds by revealing how specific poems influenced them and led them to better understand different poetic elements.

Kazim Ali (The Disappearance of Seth, Etruscan Press)

Fifty Years of FIELD: Contemporary Poetry and Poetics
Saturday, March 30, 2019
1:30 p.m. to 2:45 p.m.
B115
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
Since 1969, FIELD Magazine has been known as one of the country's leading journals of contemporary poetry and poetics. In 2019, FIELD will publish its 100th and final issue. This panel, featuring two founding editors and three later additions, will discuss the magazine's history and values, including its annual symposium of essays on the work of a major poet, its commitment to translation, and its openness to a wide variety of voices, both established and emerging.

Laurie Jean Cannady (Crave: Sojourn of a Hungry Soul, Etruscan Press) and Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing Faculty)

#MeToo, Girlhood:Writing and Subverting Childhood Sexual Violence Narratives
Thursday, March 28, 2019
3 a.m. to 4:15 p.m.
E145
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
Writers discuss creating narratives of girlhood sexual trauma, share influences and craft advice, and offer strategies for overcoming the challenges of writing these stories. The writers on this panel create works that subvert common victim narratives—via humor, style, non-linearity, narrator agency, lack of disclosure, and more—as well as examine the intersections of gender, race, class, inherited trauma, and sexual identity on narratives of sexual violence.

Laurie Jean Cannady (Crave: Sojourn of a Hungry Soul, Etruscan Press) and Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing Faculty)

Author Signing
Thursday, March 28, 2019
4:15 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Booth 3031 – AWP Bookfair

Robert Eastwood (Romer, Etruscan Press)

Author Signing
Friday, March 29, 2019
10 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Booth 3031 – AWP Bookfair

Stanton Hancock (M.F.A. ‘12)

AWP Open Mic and Old School Slam
Thursday, March 28, 2019 and Friday, March 29, 2018
B113
10 p.m. to 12 Midnight
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
AWP welcomes students to return to the roots of Slam! Open mic special guests and then undergraduate and graduate students partake in a hardcore-break-your-heart-strut-out-the-good-stuff slam competition. Students are welcome to sign up to participate on Friday, March 29, 2019 and Thursday, March 28, 2019 at the Wilkes University/Etruscan Press booth and read original pieces (three minutes or less with no props) at the Slam later that night. Sponsors: Wilkes University and Etruscan Press.

Patricia Horvath (All the Difference, Etruscan Press)

Rewriting History: Why It's Not Okay to Fictionalize Our Memories
Friday, March 29, 2019
9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m.
B114
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
Every so often, literary scandals seem to surface, particularly when it comes to memoirs. Is there an unspoken code of ethics that exists for memoirists and essayists? Or is it something deeper, something psychological that gives birth to the betrayal we feel upon discovering that a nonfiction writer has invented a character, setting, or memory? In this panel, nonfiction writers discuss the difficulty in cultivating memories while managing this genre's ethical demands and expectations.

Patricia Horvath (All the Difference, Etruscan Press)

Author Signing
Friday, March 29, 2019
2 p.m. – 3 p.m.
Booth 3031 – AWP Bookfair

David Lazar (Who's Afraid of Helen of Troy: An Essay on Love, Etruscan Press)

Que savent-ils?: What Classic Essays Can Teach Contemporary Essayists
Thursday, March 28, 2019
10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
B114
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
When's the last time you sat down with an essay by Lamb? Or cracked open The Rambler? Maybe not recently enough. With so many exciting new modes of the essay being written today, it can be easy to forget those of the past, but writers like Montaigne, Rousseau, Hazlitt, and Woolf have more bearing on contemporary essayists than you might think. This diverse panel of essayists writing in a variety of sub-genres shows how the "classics" inspire them—as perhaps they will inspire you, too.

Paul Lisicky (The Burning House, Etruscan Press)

Endings for the End Times?
Thursday, March 28, 2019
4:30 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.
Portland Ballroom 255
Oregon Convention Center
Level 2
As we reach the concluding lines of our own works, current ailments in the body politic may bend us toward chaos and despair. At the same time, ever-present narrative and commercial pressures may drive us toward neatly resolved, even uplifting, endings. How do we craft final notes that imply light and dark, open and closed, emotional and intellectual complexity? We discuss struggles and strategies for endings that feel satisfying for readers, and yet true to the work, the moment, and ourselves.

Paul Lisicky (The Burning House, Etruscan Press)

Am I Really Going to Do This Until I Die?
Friday, March 29, 2019
4:30 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.
Portland Ballroom 256
Oregon Convention Center
Level 2
The longer a person teaches workshop, the more prone he or she is to burn out; after all, instructors tend to use the same format semester after semester, and students tend to need the same advice. How can instructors keep workshops feeling relevant and energized? Are there new models that might reinvigorate our students and ourselves? This panel, featuring undergraduate and graduate writing instructors, will address strategies to keep everyone engaged, down to the most exhausted teacher.

Shara McCallum (Poems and Their Making, Etruscan Press)

Boulevard 35th Anniversary & 100 Issues Reading
Saturday, March 30, 2019
4:30 p.m. to 5:45 p.m.
B116
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
Founded in 1984, Boulevard magazine celebrates 100 issues and thirty-five years of continuously publishing the finest in contemporary voices in fiction, poetry, and definitive essays on the arts and culture. Featuring writers from across our thirty-five years, this reading reflects Boulevard's mission to present a variegated yet coherent ensemble of creative and critical writing by both emerging and established writers.

J. D. Schraffenberger (Saint Joe's Passion, Etruscan Press)

Impact and Empathy: Service-Learning and Creative Writing
Friday, March 29, 2019
10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
D139-140
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
Service-learning and community engagement not only provide student writers with real-world experiences, applied skills, and opportunities for personal growth, but their empathy and perspectives are expanded in ways that transform the creative process. Teachers from various backgrounds and institutions discuss the practical challenges and unique benefits of service-learning in the creative writing classroom, including work with veterans, oceanographers, food co-ops, and refugee organizations.

J. D. Schraffenberger (Saint Joe's Passion, Etruscan Press)

Changing of the Guard: Editors on Inclusion and Diversity in Literary Journals
Saturday, March 30, 2019
3 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
Portland Ballroom 255
Oregon Convention Center
Level 2
The VIDA Count is an indispensable measure of gender diversity in literary journal publications. While the numbers layout disparities within this community, the question remains: how can we increase contributor and staff diversity in areas such as race, sexual identity/orientation, and disability? Where is the line between diversity and tokenism? This panel of literary journal editors will share their strides, missteps, and questions on inclusive staff and contributor practices.

Tim Seibles (Fast Animal and One Turn Around the Sun, Etruscan Press) and Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing Program Advisory Board Member)

Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology Reading
Thursday, March 28, 2019
10:30 a.m. to 11:45 a.m.
Portland Ballroom 256
Oregon Convention Center
Level 2
Eco-justice poetry embodies justice, culture, and the environment. It is poetry born of ecological and social crisis, poetry that holds memory, fed by a wealth of cultural traditions, urgent in our time. Come listen to contributing poets read from and discuss the ground-breaking Ghost Fishing: An Eco-Justice Poetry Anthology, as each discusses their approach to writing in these troubled times and the traditions that feed their work.

Tim Seibles (Fast Animal and One Turn Around the Sun, Etruscan Press) and Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing Program Advisory Board Member)

How we need another soul to cling to: Writing Love Poems in Difficult Times
Saturday, March 30, 2019
3 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.
D139-140
Oregon Convention Center
Level 1
When the news feels like a daily onslaught, it's hard to believe writing a poem can matter—let alone a love poem. Here, five poets will share their own love poems and discuss how writing about love also allows them to explore everything from racism to climate change to queerness to personal grief, then offer strategies of how others might do the same. For how better to know why resistance is worth it? In this panel, we'll discuss not just what we're fighting against but what we're fighting for.

Ronnie K. Stephens (M.F.A. ’18)(The Kaleidoscope Sisters, Kaylie Jones Books)

Author Signing
Thursday, March 28, 2019
1 p.m. – 2 p.m.
Booth 3031 – AWP Bookfair

Daneen Wardrop (Silk Road, Etruscan Press)

Author Signing
Friday, March 29, 2019
4 p.m. – 5 p.m.
Booth 3031 – AWP Bookfair

For the full AWP19 schedule, visit the AWP Conference Schedule.


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